Women in STEM

June 14, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Beth Beck, l, the open innovation program manager in NASA’s Office of the Chief Information, discusses the agency’s Space Apps Challenge 2016, a global hackathon.

Give women wings, and they will soar, says one leader working hard to launch a new crop of budding scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians toward a new frontier. SIGNAL Media and AFCEA International’s Women in AFCEA tackle a multi-month project to highlight women in STEM.

June 7, 2016
By Julianne Simpson
Gen. Ellen M. Pawlikowski, commander, U.S. Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, always knew a career in STEM was meant for her.

It is said that leaders aren’t born, they’re made—and Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski embodies the notion. Motivated early on by her strong and determined mother, and then tested in her pursuit to prevail at a male-dominated career in a male-dominated world, she inspires today’s young women seeking to become the next generation of scientists, technology experts, engineers and mathematicians. SIGNAL Media and AFCEA International’s Women in AFCEA address the issue in a multi-month project to highlight women in STEM. 

May 31, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Former Lockheed Martin executive Linda Gooden has a passion for education, technology and, well, fast cars—such as her current Cadillac CTS-V with 640 horsepower that can go 200 mph.

The foundation to build the next generation of scientists, technology experts, engineers and mathematicians must be set in elementary school, particularly if the nation is going to include women in its pool of qualified STEM candidates. The United States trails other industrialized nations in education, particularly in math and science. One set of results ranked the United States 35th out of 64 countries in math and 27th in science. SIGNAL Media and AFCEA International’s Women in AFCEA address the issue in a multi-month project to highlight women in STEM.

May 24, 2016
By Sandra Jontz
Then-Brig. Gen. Sandra Finan, USAF, is honored at the National Nuclear Security Administration in 2013.

Keen focus in early years of students' education will help increase the popularity of participation in the disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, better known as STEM—particularly among girls. Leaders must color those disciplines as creative, relevant and fun, for it is diversifying the work force that will help agencies and companies better reflect those they serve. SIGNAL Media and AFCEA International’s Women in AFCEA address the issue in a multi-month project to highlight women in STEM.

May 17, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

SIGNAL Media continues with its multi-month project to highlight women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, most commonly referred to as STEM. Today, we highlight the importance of appealing to the passions of the high-tech work force that seeks to make global differences; the positive impact of networking; and addressing the issue of equal pay and acknowledgement.

May 10, 2016
By Sandra Jontz

SIGNAL Media today launches a multi-month project to highlight women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, most commonly referred to as STEM.  The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that in 1984, women earned 37 percent of college degrees in STEM fields. Fast-forward 26 years, the number had dropped to just 12 percent. SIGNAL and AFCEA International’s Women in AFCEA seek to learn why. 

July 1, 2016
By Maryann Lawlor
Engineering always fascinated Mylene Frances Lee, a technical team lead at ASM Research. After trying a couple of other fields, she landed a job in technology 21 years ago and has watched the woman-led company go from 40 employees to more than 400.

For some women, following the dream of a computer-programming career takes a pretty indirect route. Consider Mylene Frances Lee, who landed at ASM Research despite earning a seemingly unrelated degree in family life and child development. But maybe that is not such a bad background for someone who ended up working with a bunch of screen junkies.

Lee considered many careers. A native of the Philippines, she always was interested in computers. But when the time came to choose a major, she discovered that the University of the Philippines’ engineering college, although open to all, was entirely male. Instead, she decided to major in accounting. 

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