Agenda

Monday, June 25, 2018

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.
REGISTRATION, CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST


8:00 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.
AFCEA WELCOME

Mr. Ray Cross
Vice President for Intelligence
AFCEA International
LTG Robert Noonan, USA (Ret.)
Member, AFCEA Intelligence Committee

8:15 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.
OPENING REMARKS
 

LTG Scott Berrier, USA
Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2

8:30 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
KEYNOTE ADDRESS

The Honorable Mr. Joseph Kernan, Vice Admiral, U.S. Navy, retired, is the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence (USD(I)) and was unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate in November 2017. As the USD(I), Mr. Kernan is the principal intelligence, counterintelligence, and security advisor to the Secretary of Defense (SecDef) and the SecDef's principal representative to the Intelligence Community. Prior to serving as the USD(I), Mr. Kernan served in a variety of positions from 2013-2017, including: Board Director and Senior Vice President of Corporate Development and Marketing for SAP National Security Services and Advisor for JLM Companies.
 
The Honorable Joseph Kernan, VADM, USN (Ret.)
Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence

Focus Questions:

  • Defense Intel Enterprise innovation initiatives with industry
  • Defense Acquisition Reform-adaptive acquisition framework
  • Critical technology protection and industrial security

9:15 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK


10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
PANEL ONE: MI FUTURE VISION -- INTELLIGENCE TRAINING, READINESS, OPERATIONS TO MAINTAIN DECISIVE ADVANTAGE
The Army Intelligence Enterprise is comprised of six fundamentally distinct disciplines working together to support Commander situational awareness: Counterintelligence (CI) and Security Countermeasures (SCM); Human Intelligence (HUMINT); Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT); Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT); Open Source Intelligence (OSINT); Technical Intelligence (TECHINT); and Signals Intelligence (SIGINT). The resources required to train the intelligence staff are directly tied to the complexity of the enemy situation. The related tasks and systems that facilitate understanding the enemy, weather, terrain, and civil considerations are essential to the Intelligence Warfighting Function (IWfF). It includes the synchronization of collection requirements with the execution of tactical tasks such as reconnaissance, surveillance, and related intelligence operations. Faced with a complex and evolving security environment, Army Intelligence requires a directional and provisional blueprint for the future. Industry plays a key role throughout the training, readiness, and operations domains to ensure we are prepared for the rigors of sustained combat

Moderator
LTG Scott Berrier, USA
Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2

THE FUTURE OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENT (OE)

Speaker
Mr. Tom Greco
TRADOC, G2

Focus Questions:

  • Who are the central threat actors, what types of equipment will they use to challenge U.S. interests, and what type of environments must the U.S. Army be prepared to face in the future? 
  • What are the key Army intelligence needs and gaps in the near term (up to 2025); mid-term (2026–2035); and far-term (2035– 2050)?

CRITICAL TRAINING GAPS/TECHNOLOGY FOR MULTI-DISCIPLINE INTELLIGENCE OPERATIONS AT ECHELON CORPS AND BELOW
Intelligence training helps maintain readiness. Army Intelligence training develops professionals that operate as key members of the Joint and National Intelligence Community at every level, from tactical to strategic. The USAICoE manages and executes intelligence training and education under TRADOC. It designs, develops, and integrates intelligence capabilities, concepts, and doctrine (including individual and collective training tasks) in support of Unified Land Operations.

Speaker
MG Robert Walters, USA

Commanding General, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence

Focus Questions:

  • What critical technologies are needed to support multi-discipline intelligence operations at echelon corps and below? 
  • What are the top training gaps and how could industry help?
  • What intelligence framework gaps exist under the Current Intel 2020 construct? 

INTELLIGENCE READINESS AND TRAINING
FORSCOM sources, equips, trains, mobilizes, and deploys conventional forces to provide a sustained flow of trained and ready land power to Combatant Commanders and the Army Service Component Commands. Within FORSCOM, the U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC) manages manning, training, certification, readiness, and mobilization of U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) Intelligence Soldiers. Following training/education in the institutional training domain, Soldiers enter the operational Army where they sustain their intelligence training. Unit Commanders introduce individual and collective skills required by a Soldier’s specialty or the unit’s mission essential task list (METL), integrate them into cohesive intelligence teams and continue to build and sustain those skills. Collective training events are conducted IAW Combined Arms Training Strategies (CATS). Commanders and leaders at all levels must develop readiness with limited resources, synchronize and prioritize training resources, and mitigate resource limitations through increased use of virtual, constructive, and gaming capabilities. 

Speaker
COL Tim Parker, USA 

FORSCOM, G-2

Focus Questions:

  • With the push to modernize what changes are needed to train and equip the force, and how could industry potentially help?
  • What types of future intelligence collective training programs could potentially leverage Synthetic Training Environments (STE)?
  • What are the top training items which the operating force must sustain to maintain high levels intelligence readiness? 

ARMY RESERVE INTELLIGENCE READINESS
The U.S. Army Reserve Command provides an adaptive and innovative intelligence force responsible for collecting intelligence during Army missions, providing the joint force and intelligence community with trained and ready Soldiers, mission-tailored teams and units, and state-of-the-art intelligence production and training facilities. Its mission set includes conducting signal intelligence, strategic intelligence, counterintelligence, human intelligence, technological intelligence, and collection operations.

Speaker
Mr. David Giffen
U.S. Army Reserve Command, G-2

Focus Questions:

  • How can industry help with training, certification, and readiness gaps for U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) intelligence Soldiers?
  • What improvements are required to enhance Theater Support Battalion (TSB)support to Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM) Theater Intelligence Brigades(TIBs)?

NATIONAL GUARD INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT
The Army National Guard (ARNG) G2 is responsible for the policy, planning, programming, budgeting, management, staff supervision, evaluation, and oversight of ARNG intelligence activities at the national level. The ARNG G2 coordinates with the 54 States and Territories, HQDA, and within the National Guard Bureau to ensure ARNG MI formations and positions are manned, trained, equipped, ready, and continuously engaged in support of Army missions.

Speaker
COL Brent Richards, USA 

U.S. Army National Guard, G-2

Focus Questions:

  • What technology investments could enhance analytic exchanges, training programs, and exercises to improve readiness across multiple intelligence disciplines?
  • How can Industry, through the ARNG, leverage the talent of the American people by supporting the Secretary of the Army's Vision?
  • How does the ARNG support and enable Cyber intelligence requirements with its unique domestic operations roles and authorities? 

INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT TO ARMY SOF
The United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) mans, trains, equips, educates, organizes, sustains, and supports forces to conduct special warfare and surgical strike across the full range of military operations and spectrum of conflict in support of joint force commanders and interagency partners, to meet theater and national objectives. USASOC is enhancing intelligence collection, analysis, and synthesis capabilities, particularly with regard to understanding and characterizing the human domain and indicators/warnings for gray zone threats. 

Speaker
Mr. Byron Castleman

USASOC, G-2

Focus Questions:

  • What are key USASOC S&T initiatives, investments, concepts and innovative ideas to address the most pressing SOF intelligence operation shortfalls?
  • How will SOF Intelligence Systems and Sensors (ISS) programs evolve to meet multi-domain challenges to support Army missions?
  • How does industry interact with the USASOC S&T Division?

INTELLIGENCE SUPPORT TO ARMY, COCOMS, AND IC
INSCOM manages manning, training, equipping, technical certification, and supports MI forces in conjunction with Army Forces Command (FORSCOM), the U.S. Army Reserve Command, the National Guard, and the Army Resource Model. In conjunction with FORSCOM and TRADOC, INSCOM is dedicated to replicating the Intelligence Enterprise at home station, Combat Training Centers, Warfighter Exercises and other collective training events through the Military Intelligence Advanced Collective Training Environment (MIACTE).

Speaker
MG Gary Johnston, USA 

Commanding General, INSCOM

Focus Questions:

  • What technologies are critical to support intelligence at echelon corps and above?
  • What are the top capability gaps that hamper SIGINT/CYBER support to the warfighter?
  • What technologies can industry provide to help bring processing closer to the sensor?
  • How does INSCOM partner with FORSCOM to address military intelligence training readiness issues?
  • What are some of the INSCOM Headquarters gaps (AI, PED, machine translation, advanced analytics, etc)? 

12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.
NETWORKING LUNCH


1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
PANEL TWO: CROSS FUNCTIONAL TEAMS -- HOW INTELLIGENCE NESTS

The Chief of Staff of the Army established six Army Modernization Priorities: i) Long Range Precision Fires, ii) Next Generation Combat Vehicle, iii) Future Vertical Lift, iv) The Network, v) Air and Missile Defense, and vi) Soldier Lethality. These modernization priorities are the foundation around which Army Science and Technology will invest. Last year, the U.S. Army created several CFT pilot programs to narrow existing capability gaps by developing capability documents, informed in appropriate cases by experimentation and technical demonstrations, and rapidly transition leader-approved capability requirements to the Army Acquisition System.  This approach will allow the Army to develop capabilities faster and in a less costly manner to enable our Soldiers to fight and win. This new model provides a tremendous opportunity for the entire Army Intelligence enterprise.

 

Moderator
MG James Richardson, USA 
Special Advisor for Program Integration, Office of the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army
 

LONG RANGE PRECISION FIRES CFT
The Long Range Precision Fires CFT will narrow capability gaps in the long-range surface to surface fires portfolio. The CFT will embrace horizontal and vertical integration and dramatically improve the speed of capability development activities informed by warfighter requirements; experiments and conduct technical demonstrations; accelerate the maturation of technology where appropriate and rapidly transition leader approved capabilities to a program of record to enable the rapid delivery of high quality capabilities to the warfighter faster and cheaper.

Speaker
COL John Rafferty, USA 
Director, CFT - Long Range Precision Fires

 

NETWORKING COMMAND, CONTROL, COMMUNICATION, AND INTELLIGENCE (C3I) CFT
The Network C3I CFT will narrow capability gaps by developing capability documents, informed by technical demonstrations, experimentations, and user assessments, and then rapidly transition a leader-approved capability into the Army.  Our current network is complex, not expeditionary, easy to detect and jam, difficult to secure and not optimized to deliver. To get to a new modernization path forward, we must first understand the current network challenges and how we got here, along with the readiness challenges and the risk we face due to emerging threats. Based on these challenges and risks to the Solider and the findings and recommendations from internal and external assessments, the Army plans to embark on a new network modernization path forward. 

Speaker
MG Peter Gallagher, USA 
Director, CFT - Network C3I, Director of Architecture, Operations, Networks
and Space Office of the Chief Information Officer/G-6 

SYNTHETIC TRAINING ENVIRONMENT (STE)
The STE CFT will focus on existing priority capability gaps by developing capability documents informed by experimentation and technical demonstrations, and rapidly transition leader-approved capability requirements to the Army Acquisition System.

Speaker
MG Maria Gervais, USA 
Deputy Commanding General, Combined Arms Center - Training

Focus Questions:

  • Moderator - how will the CFT use industry market research, technical demonstrations, experimentations, user assessments to operationally inform requirements?
  • What types of intelligence capability gaps exist to effectively support Long Range Precision Fires; Network Command, Control, Communication, and Intelligence (C3I); the Synthetic Training Environment (STE)? 
  • What is a general timeline for any requests for whitepapers or proposals for industry? 

2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

PANEL THREE: INDUSTRY OPPORTUNITIES
PEO IEW&S develops and integrates sensors and sensor data across multiple technologies ensuring warfighters have a complete understanding of the battlefield. This is achieved through our ability to assimilate sensor information into relevant, timely products that can be used for targeting, situational awareness, force protection, and Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA).

Moderator
MG Kirk Vollmecke, USA
Program Executive Officer for Intelligence, Electronic Warfare, and Sensor
Panelists
COL Robert Collins, USA
Program Manager, Distributed Common Ground System   Army (DCGS-A)
COL Marty Hagenston, USA 
Program Manager, Electronic Warfare & Cyber (EW&C)
Mr. Chris Keller 
Program Manager, Sensors-Aerial Intelligence (SAI)
Mr. Mark Kitz
Chief Engineer, Program Executive Office for Intelligence, Electronic Warfare, and Sensor (PEO IEW&S)
Mr. Patrick O’Neill, SES 
Director, Communications - Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC)

Focus Questions:

Which intelligence programs are the Army focusing on, and where are the growth areas for Industry? 
What are the planned updates and technology bridges to posture currently deployed systems and Programs of Records (PoR) across the Intelligence Warfighting Function to better adopt and adapt maturing technologies for automation?
What role will open-source technology play within the PEO / PM priorities?  
What contract opportunities are forecasted?  
 

3:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. 
EVENT WRAP-UP

LTG Scott Berrier, USA
Deputy Chief of Staff, G-2

LTG Robert Noonan, USA (Ret.)
Member, AFCEA Intelligence Committee