Agenda

 

CERTS 2020 Archived Recordings and Presentations

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

12:00 noon - 4:00 p.m.

Presentations/Training Sessions
Augusta Marriott

9:00 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Registration Open
Terrace Room

12:00 noon - 1:00 p.m.

Crafting a Vision for Empowered Learning and Teaching (Session is repeated at 3pm)
Lamar C

High-speed networks, digital devices, and creative applications are revolutionizing education. Students can be empowered to take their learning to deeper and deeper levels while developing essential skills that will prepare them for success in the 21st century.  Students are able to access learning anywhere, any time, on almost any device. Teachers can work freely on campus with reliable connections.  No longer tied to a single location, they can offer a more enriched educational experience.

Video and collaboration are not new to education, however today’s advancements in technology provides innovative ways to transform the classroom.  During this conversation, we want to show you how using the right tool, for the right job at the right time, can enable a variety of communicative strategies to reach learners, using whatever modality is available.  Additionally, we’ll broach leveraging social media experiences through tools like show and share for student interaction to provide alternate modalities for assessment. Whether it’s a portable media device, like the iPad or a space-centric tool like an electronic whiteboards, making use of interactive video transparently to learning can transform teaching and leading.

Dr. Lance Ford, Educational Technology Advocate, Cisco

Sign-up for session here

12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.

Creating a Comprehensive Security Fabric (Version 6.2)
Cumming Room
Approved for 2 CertNexus CFR CEC; 2 CompTIA CEUs for A+, Network+, Security+, Linux+, Cloud+, PenTest+, CySA+, CASP+

Today’s new world of networking requires a new approach to security: one that is simple, yet intelligent, and secures the entire infrastructure; one that delivers full visibility into every viable network segment and the devices and endpoints behind them; one that can seamlessly integrate with third-party solutions, enabling users to ubiquitously collect, share, and correlate threat intelligence. The Fortinet Security Fabric represents an architectural security approach designed to dynamically adapt to today’s evolving IT infrastructure. This multi-layered approach provides broad, integrated, and automated protection against sophisticated threats.  Attendees at this session will receive an introduction to the Fortinet Security Fabric and participate in a discussion of the main business drivers.  Additionally, attendees will learn how to weave the security fabric for improved visibility and control; strengthen the fabric to protect against known threats, and expand the security fabric and enhance the value of fabric-ready partners.

Attend this technical training workshop and gain hands-on experience configuring a comprehensive security fabric including Fortinet products and Fortinet Fabric-Ready Partner products.

Matt France, Technical Trainer - Fast Track Program, Fortinet

Note:  Attendees are requested to bring a laptop to enable participation in a lab portion of the training

Sign-up for session here

1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

Army Joint Enterprise Level Agreement (JELA) Cisco Briefing
Lamar C

The Defense INformation Technology Contracting Organization (DITCO) entered into a Joint Enterprise License Agreement II (JELA II) with Cisco for enterprise-wide technical support and services in June 2019.  Through this JELA, the Army has access to Cisco Smart Net Total Care for all eligibile Cisco branded equipment and a number of other Value-Added Services.  Attend this 1 hour session to gain additional information on this current Army Contract.

NOTE: Given the contractual nature of this discussion, this meeting is only open to current active military and DoD employees.

Sign-up for session here

2:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Secrets to Successful Cyber Security Briefings
Lamar B
Approved for 2 GIAC CPEs; 2 CompTIA CEUs: A+, Security+, PenTest+, CySA+

Security professionals often make errors while presenting important security information. Those errors cause their audiences – whether technical peers or senior leaders – to discount their ideas.  When speakers can eliminate those errors, their impact improves, and they can make a much greater difference in improving security.

In this fast-paced briefing you will see ten of the more important errors illustrated, understand how they impact audiences, and see ways to eliminate them. Among them is the single most common error security people make that loses audiences’ attention right from the start of their presentations. You will see examples of gruesomely bad visuals used in actual government security briefings. You will also see the most powerful tool good speakers use that many security speakers fail to employ. This short course at AFCEA CERTS is a subset of SANS new course of the same title that was developed to give SANS Technology Institute master's degree and undergraduate students an edge in presenting security information for maximum impact.

Alan Paller, Founder, SANS Institute

Sign-up for session here

2:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Constructing a Secure SD-WAN Architecture (Version 6.2)
Cumming Room
Approved for 2 CompTIA CEUs for A+, Network+, Security+, Linux+, Cloud+, PenTest+, CySA+, CASP+

As organizations transition to a digital business model, their network topologies are significantly impacted.  The adoption of cloud services, the virtualization of the traditional network, and an increasingly mobile workforce accessing applications in the cloud are accelerating advancements in wide area networking technologies.  The traditional wide area network (WAN) is struggling to keep up because it relies on a static infrastructure of devices that simply can't accommodate shifting, and often temporary resource allocation and workloads.

Matt France, Technical Trainer - Fast Track Program, Fortinet

Note:  Attendees are requested to bring a laptop to enable participation in a lab portion of the training

Sign-up for session here

3:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Crafting a Vision for Empowered Learning and Teaching (Repeat of session at 12noon)
Lamar C

High-speed networks, digital devices, and creative applications are revolutionizing education. Students can be empowered to take their learning to deeper and deeper levels while developing essential skills that will prepare them for success in the 21st century.  Students are able to access learning anywhere, any time, on almost any device. Teachers can work freely on campus with reliable connections.  No longer tied to a single location, they can offer a more enriched educational experience.

Video and collaboration are not new to education, however today’s advancements in technology provides innovative ways to transform the classroom.  During this conversation, we want to show you how using the right tool, for the right job at the right time, can enable a variety of communicative strategies to reach learners, using whatever modality is available.  Additionally, we’ll broach leveraging social media experiences through tools like show and share for student interaction to provide alternate modalities for assessment. Whether it’s a portable media device, like the iPad or a space-centric tool like an electronic whiteboards, making use of interactive video transparently to learning can transform teaching and leading.

Dr. Lance Ford, Educational Technology Advocate, Cisco

Sign-up for session here

5:00 - 6:30 p.m. 

CERTS Ice Breaker
Marriott Hotel

 

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

7:00 - 8:00 a.m.

Registration and Continental Breakfast
Terrace Room and Oglethorpe Ballroom Foyer

8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Capture the Flag - Lower Level (Secondary Schools)
Georgia Cyber Center, Hull McKnight Building, Virtual World

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.: students are assigned CTF leaders. (NOTE: students should not arrive before 9:00 a.m.)
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.: students participate and compete for the CTF challenge. 

The AFCEA CERTS Middle/High School Capture the Flag (CTF) Competition is a 4-hour, jeopardy-Style competition for aspiring cyber and cybersecurity professionals. This competition is a learning tool that will measure the participant's current familiarity with various cybersecurity topics and will further sharpen the tools they have learned through education or self-learning. The CTF provides opportunities to share ideas amongst team members and with other teams, promoting the concept of continual learning for the students.

The Jeopardy-style CTF is similar to the actual Jeopardy game as the scoreboard looks like a Jeopardy board with different categories and point values. In this competition, teams are not trying to attack each other. They are instead focused on the challenge at hand depending upon what category is selected.  The categories for the competition are Cryptography, Steganography, Physical Security, Reverse Engineering, Forensics, Networking and Scanning. Some of the challenges can be done against a main server that was developed for the CTF and the flag is inputted into the CTF scoreboard to get points for the team. A timer is used to start and stop the CTF and once the timer finishes, the game is over. As stated above, the competition will last 4 hours. The team with the most points at the end wins.  Awards will be presented following completion of winner notification.

Instructors
Thomas Barnes, Director, Strategic Cyber Operations Plans and Programming, Parsons
Brett Hite, Senior Software Engineer, Parsons
Nicholas Jackson, Cyber Thaumaturgy Director, Parsons
Sharon Martin, Senior Systems Analyst, Parsons
 

Register for the Capture the Flag (separate from CERTS registration)

8:00 - 8:10 a.m.

Welcome and Symposium Overview
Oglethorpe Ballroom

LtGen Robert M. Shea, USMC (Ret.), President & CEO, AFCEA International

8:10 - 8:45 a.m.

Welcome and Event Design
Oglethorpe Ballroom

MG Neil S. Hersey, Commanding General, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence & Fort Gordon

8:45 - 9:30 a.m.

Updates to NICE Cybersecurity Workforce Framework
Oglethorpe Ballroom

Building on the first presentation, this session will highlight the activities begun by the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education program office at NIST to update the NICE Framework.  At the November NICE Conference, a request for comments was issued to gather input on potential improvements to the NICE Framework, a national-focused standard that categorizes and describes cybersecurity work published.  Input was also gathered up until January 13th on awareness, applications, and uses of the NICE Framework.  This session will explore some of that RFC input and will also tee up the public, transparent, and consensus based processes that NIST will use to develop an update to the NICE Framework helping it to grow to be the resource and standard that best supports our nation’s workforce, training, and education needs. 

Bill Newhouse, Deputy Director, National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) Program Office, Senior Security Engineer, National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence, NIST representative to Federal Cybersecurity Research & Development Interagency Groups

9:00 a.m.

Exhibits Open
Oglethorpe Foyer and Plaza Lobby

9:30 - 10:00 a.m.

Networking Break
Oglethorpe Foyer and Plaza Lobby

10:00 - 11:00 a.m.

Four Keys to a World-Class Cyber Workforce Program
Oglethorpe Ballroom
Approved for 1 CertNexus CFR CEC; 1 CompTIA CEU for A+, Network+, Security+, Linux+, Cloud+, PenTest+, CySA+, CASP+

Through innovation and determination, U.S. and U.K. military and civilian educators have forged increasingly effective cybersecurity workforce pipelines and discovered, along the way, which initiatives work better than others and which are counterproductive. This session brings together several of the most seasoned and productive of those educators to share key discoveries that had the greatest impact on ensuring that graduates of the national pipeline emerge with world-class cyber skills.  Among the core challenges the panel will address are how to select students who have the best chance to excel, how to overcome the key barrier identified by the military academies that stops most of their students from mastering the technical aspects of cybersecurity, how to inspire younger students with high aptitude to pursue cybersecurity as a career – especially young women, the foundational prerequisites for cybersecurity training, and how to measure the effectiveness of cybersecurity workforce programs.

Moderator
Alan Paller, Founder, SANS Institute

Panelists
COL David Haines, Assistant Commandant, Army Signal School, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence  
James Lyne, Chief Technology Officer, Sophos
COL Eric Toler, USA (Ret.), Executive Director, Georgia Cyber Center

11:00 - 11:30 a.m.

Cyber Workforce - Call to Action
Oglethorpe Ballroom

U.S. Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER) has the responsibility of operating and defending Army networks and delivering cyberspace effects against all adversaries to defend the nation.   As such the command has a requirement for leadership oversight of over 16,500 Soldiers, civilian employees, and contractors.  Attracting and retaining the workforce are high priorities for the Command.  The cyber workforce requires expertise in all facets of an operational command that includes a consolidated workforce that is highly trained to defend the information network, to deliver both defensive and offensive cyberspace effects against adversaries and is capable of rapid deployment.  The training that is conducted reinforces education and training received by all members in a live threat environment.  Retention of the expertise of the Army Cyber Workforce is essential to the mission of the command and the safety of our citizens. This presentation will highlight all of the topic building blocks for the Cyber workforce as it applies to an operational cyber command organization. 

LTG Stephen G. Fogarty, USA, Commanding General, U.S. Army Cyber Command
 

11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Lunch
Lamar ABC

12:45 - 1:45 p.m.

Federal, State, and Local Perspectives on Workforce Training and Education
Oglethorpe Ballroom

When you think of a Cyber Workforce, your first thoughts might be focused on the Federal Government to serve as the safety valve for all of us.  This is just one leg of the stool that includes State and Local initiatives and challenges to meet the needs of developing a robust and well trained cyber workforce.  Cybersecurity is a national imperative that reaches down to the local level within our states.  Efforts that impact all levels of government include, but are not limited to recruiting, evaluating, selecting, paying, and placing, and retaining cyber talent.  This session will address a leadership commitment by the U.S. Government to take a variety of actions to better manage cybersecurity risks through coordination nationally.  

Moderator
John McCumber, Director of Cybersecurity Advocacy, North America, (ISC)
 
Panelists
Earl F. "Fred" Bisel, Cybersecurity Education and Certification Readiness Facility Manager, Naval Information Warfare Center (NIWC)
Douglas C. Rapp, CEO/FOUNDER, Cyber Leadership Alliance

Tom Peters, Ed.D., Executive Director, Carolina's Coalition for Mathematics & Science, Clemson University

 

1:45 - 2:00 p.m.

Networking Break
Oglethorpe Foyer and Plaza Lobby

2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Academic Perspectives on Workforce Training and Education
Oglethorpe Ballroom

To attain a strong cybersecurity workforce, it will take a strong education component at all levels of education and training to close a gap of over 350,000 cybersecurity jobs.  We will see that much of this training occurs at Department of Defense Cyber Schools, but the majority of education and training occurs at schools, colleges, and universities.  K-12, Colleges, Universities, and Trade School are critical to the training and education of future cyber professionals.   Keeping STEM in mind, a cybersecurity focused degree will go a long way to enhance the overall cybersecurity workforce.  The rate of change and innovation requires that information security training and education can change to meet needs of today and tomorrow.  This session will provide leaders in training and education to share their successes and needs to help train and educate the cybersecurity workforce.

Moderator
Paul J. Maurer, Ph.D., President, Montreat College

Panelists
Raheem A. Beyah, Ph.D., Vice President for Interdisciplinary Research, Georgia Institute of Technology
Kent Malwitz, President of Cyber Training Centers, UMBC
Alexander Schwarzmann, Ph.D., Dean and Professor, Augusta University
Edward Sobiesk, Ph.D., Chief of Education/Professor of Computer and Cyber Science, Army Cyber Institute
Dwayne T. Williams, Deputy Commandant, Signal School, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence

3:00 - 3:30 p.m.

Networking Break
Oglethorpe Foyer and Plaza Lobby

3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

Industry Perspectives on Workforce Training and Education
Oglethorpe Ballroom

The Center for Strategic & International Studies released a study during January 2019 highlighting that “IT decision makers across eight countries found that 82 percent of employers report a shortage of cybersecurity skills and 71 percent believe this talent gap causes direct and measurable damage to their organizations.  There is clearly a cybersecurity workforce gap throughout all levels of government, academia, and industry.  Further, there is a critical need for industry to recruit and retain skilled cybersecurity professionals that can protect networks as well as intellectual property that are the targets of cybercriminals as well as nation-state actors seeking to steal valuable property that can then be used against U.S. Government or Industry.  This session will highlight how industry is addressing two key areas:  First, the current cybersecurity workforce is approaching 319,000 employed positions of an   existing workforce need of approximately 716,000 trained and skilled cybersecurity professional.  In addition to discussing how to attract, recruit, and train this growing workforce, the second area highlighted will be how the U.S. will fill a projected cybersecurity workforce that is estimated to be approaching 1.8 million unfilled positions by 2022 according to a Global Information Security Workforce Study by Frost & Sullivan in 2017.  Attendees will discuss with the panel and gain an appreciation of how industry is addressing these challenges and how critical action is needed now to meet both the challenges and the growth of a broad cybersecurity workforce.

Moderator
Philip O'Reilly, Vice President for Sales & Strategy, Juniper Networks

Panelists
Ryan Bagby, Senior Program Manager, Cybersecurity Special Missions, Raytheon Intelligence, Information & Services
RDML Dwight D. Shepherd, USN (Ret.), Dwight Shepherd Consulting and More, LLC
Tammy Heller, Senior Vice President, Chief Human Resources Officer, Perspecta
Bradley M. Wolfenden, Business Development & Marketing Strategy, By Light, LLC. | EmberSec

 
4:30 - 5:00 p.m.

DoD Cyber Workforce
Oglethorpe Ballroom

The responsibilities of the Department of Defense CIO includes all things relating to the DoD information enterprise.  This includes cybersecurity, communications, and information systems and essentially all matters of information management.  Associated responsibilities include information technology, information assurance, non-intelligence spaces systems, critical satellite communications, navigation and timing programs, and spectrum.  In common with all of these responsibilities is a skilled workforce to insure that all systems are working at peak performance and all DoD enterprise work can be accomplished.  This session will look at the broad workforce that is responsible for day to day operations, and how the DoD CIO attracts, trains, and retains the men and women.

Essye B. Miller, Principle Deputy, Department of Defense Chief Information Officer, US Department of Defense

5:00 - 6:30 p.m.

Networking Reception & Poster Show
Riverwalk Hallway

 

Thursday, January 16, 2020

7:00 - 8:00 a.m.

Registration and Continental Breakfast
Terrace Room and Oglethorpe Ballroom Foyer

8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. 

Capture the Flag - Upper Level
Georgia Cyber Center, Hull McKnight Building, Virtual World

9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.: competitors are assigned CTF leaders. (NOTE: competitors should not arrive before 9:00 a.m.)
10:00 a.m. – 2:00p.m.: c
ompetitors  participate and compete for the CTF challenge. 

AFCEA CERTS Military/Collegiate Capture the Flag (CTF) Competition

The AFCEA CERTS Military/Collegiate CTF Competition is a 4-hour, Jeopardy-Style competition for aspiring and seasoned cyber and cybersecurity professionals. This competition is a learning tool that will measure the participant's current familiarity with various cybersecurity topics and will further sharpen the tools they have learned through education, training or self-learning. The CTF provides opportunities to share ideas amongst team members and with other teams, promoting the concept of continual learning for the Soldiers and students.

The Jeopardy-style CTF is similar to the actual Jeopardy game as the scoreboard looks like a Jeopardy board with different categories and point values. In this competition, teams are not trying to attack each other. They are instead focused on the challenge at hand depending upon what category is selected.  The categories for the competition are Cryptography, Steganography, Physical Security, Reverse Engineering, Forensics, Networking and Scanning. Some of the challenges can be done against a main server that was developed for the CTF and the flag is inputted into the CTF scoreboard to get points for the team. A timer is used to start and stop the CTF and once the timer finishes, the game is over. As stated above, the competition will last 4 hours. The team with the most points at the end wins. Some teams will be remote.  Awards will be presented following completion of winner notification.

Instructors
Thomas Barnes, Director, Strategic Cyber Operations, Parsons
Brett Hite, Senior Software Engineer, Parsons
Nicholas Jackson, Cyber Thaumaturgy Director, Parsons
Sharon Martin, Senior Systems Analyst, Parsons

Register for the Capture the Flag (separate from CERTS registration)

8:00 - 8:05 a.m.

Welcome and Recap
Oglethorpe Ballroom

LTG Bob Wood, USA (Ret.), Executive Vice President, AFCEA International

8:05 - 9:00 a.m.

Panel: Challenges of Recruiting and Retaining the Cyber Workforce
Oglethorpe Ballroom

A discussion of recruiting and retaining the cyber workforce directly impacts our Armed Forces and Fort Gordon is the home of the Army Signal and Cyber Schools, that have the responsibility for training and shaping soldiers as professional Signal and Cybersecurity operators.  At a higher level, there is the overall requirement and challenge of managing and shaping talent management for Soldiers overall.  Developing talent is a key to cybersecurity and to developing a robust plan to acquire, develop, employ, and retain the best men and women within the Army.  This session will provide a glimpse of Army Talent Management and introduce to the audience a program entitled AIM 2.0 that will move Army force forward.  It will empower commanders in the assignment process and provide transparency and knowledge of placing the best men and women in essential roles.  The program will match skills with training, education, and experience to enhance the warfighting value of every Soldier.

Moderator
MG Garrett Yee, USA, Assistant to the Director, Defense Information Systems Agency

Members
COL Paul G. Craft, USAChief of Cyber/Commandant, US Army Cyber School
BG Christopher L. Eubank, USA, Chief of Signal/Commandant, US Army Signal School
COL Derek E. Lane, Commanding  Officer, MCCES
Ronald W. Pontius, Deputy to the Commanding General, U.S. Army Cyber Command

9:00 - 9:45 a.m.

Military Talent Management Panel
Oglethorpe Ballroom

Moderator
CSM Carlos M. Simmons, USA, Command Sergeant Major, Army Cyber Center of Excellence & Fort Gordon

Panelists
CSM Christian Adkison, 780th MI Brigade
CSM Julie Guerra, USA, Cyber Corps CSM, U.S. Army Cyber School
CSM Richard D. Knott, United States Army Signal School
SGM Camie A. Rodgers, Talent Manager, Sergeants Major Branch, Enlisted Personnel Management Directorate, U.S. Army Human Resources Command Fort Knox

9:30 a.m.

Exhibits Open
Oglethorpe Foyer and Plaza Lobby

9:45 - 10:15 a.m. Networking Break
Oglethorpe Foyer and Plaza Lobby
 

10:15 - 11:30 a.m.

STEM and Beyond - Building the Talent Pipeline
Oglethorpe Ballroom

Why has the U.S. ranking in STEM dropped from on top or near the top of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) leadership over the past 15 years and is there a correlation between STEM expertise and a U.S. failure to attract, train, and retain STEM related cybersecurity talent.  Is the student population that is falling behind, the teachers who may not be qualified, or is it something else?  In order to attract, train, and educate the workforce that can meet cybersecurity needs of today in the workforce, elementary and secondary school age children must be attracted and essentially guided into the STEM.

Moderator
Natalie Lorenz Anderson, Vice President, K12 STEM Programs, Girl Scouts of Nation's Capital and Vice President Special Programs, 247Solar Inc.

Panelists
Felicia Cullars, Ed.S., STEM/STEAM Program Specialist, Georgia Department of Education
Ashley Gess, Assistant Professor of STEAM Education, College of Education, Department of Teaching and Learning, Augusta University
Amanda Schutt, Chief Operations Officer, Science from Scientists
Kelly Shannon, Senior Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

Panel Resources

STEM and Beyond Resources

STEM Enrichment Resources

America's Children: Providing Early Exposure to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, & Math) Initiatives

Science Achievement Gaps by Gender and Race/Ethnicity in Elementary and Middle School: Trends and Predictors

Using Phenomena in NGSS-Designed Lessons and Units

The Effects of a Statewide Evaluation Initiative in Gifted Education on Practitioner Knowledge, Concerns, and Program Documentation

Quick Reference Guide: Phenomena in the Classroom

Girl Scout STEM Badges and Journey Awards

Eyeballs in the Fridge: Sources of Early Interest in Science

11:30 a.m.

Lunch Buffet Opens

12:00 - 1:30 p.m.

Sharing Best Practices and Lessons Learned Breakout Sessions

Attract & Recruit
Lamar

The United States is falling behind in the race for STEM related skills to compete in the future.   In this workshop attendees will discuss in general why the United States is falling behind near peer competitors and others.  The discussion might include how skills, knowledge and behavior are developed and choices are made to shape the future of our young men and women.   Education teaches young men and women how to think, not what to think, so how do we coach our youth to move into STEM related skills.  We’ll start in Kindergarten, followed by Elementary and Secondary School in the discussion.  We’ll find that each individual develops a talent, introductory skills, knowledge, and behavior as they grow.  Parents, teachers, and advisors are key components for developing young people.   Do we have the right approach for coaching toward a STEM related career or is something missing?

Chair:  Natalie Lorenz Anderson, Vice President, K12 STEM Programs, Girl Scouts of Nation's Capital and Vice President Special Programs, 247Solar Inc.

Co-Chairs:  SGM Camie A. Rodgers, Talent Manager, Sergeants Major Branch, Enlisted Personnel Management Directorate, U.S. Army Human Resources Command Fort Knox
LTC Elizabeth M. Popiak, Deputy Director, Office Chief of Cyber, U.S. Army Cyber School

Attract & Recruit Workshop Outbrief

Train & Educate
2nd Floor Olmstead Pre-Function Area

Once an individual chooses a STEM or other technology related field for study there are choices that include, but are not limited to on the job training, technical training, or a college degree.   During this workshop, attendees will identify the top 3 challenges in training technical skills and the top 3 best practices on how young men and women are developed through training, education, or a career management mentor.  Sometimes skills are developed through an individual by working as an intern, or joining the Armed Forces.  Not all required skill sets include a STEM background, but technology today requires a knowledge in fundamentals.  Workshop #1 addressed identifying STEM related skills for the youth of the United States.  If we look at closing a gap of over 300,000 cybersecurity/STEM skills, could the gap be closed by re-training men and women who are or have been in the Military and/or hire skilled workforce men and women who are transitioning into industry or from industry to the military with cybersecurity skills.

Chair LTC Frank X. Sperl III, USA, Director, Signal Leader Development College, U.S. Army Signal School

Co-Chairs:  Bill Newhouse, Deputy Director, National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education (NICE) Program Office, Senior Security Engineer, National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence, NIST representative to Federal Cybersecurity Research & Development Interagency Groups
Raquel Hill, Ph.D., Chair, Computer and Information Sciences, Spelman College
LTC Jason E. Allen, USA, Director, Signal Enlisted Development College, U.S. Army Signal School

 

Train & Educate Workshop Outbrief
 

Retain
Oglethorpe 

Retaining talent requires collaboration, individual training, learning, education, and on the job experience that extends the talent and optimizes performance by all individuals or teams.  During this workshop, attendees will highlight the top 3 problems faced in retaining the Cyber workforce and the top 3 best practices used by Industry, Government, or Academia to retain and expand the workforce.  Reaching established training, education, and skills are critical for an employee to move into the government, academia, or industry workforce.  Once in the workforce leadership needs to motivate, continuously train and educate, and continue the professional development of the individuals and teams.  Participants in this workshop will discuss how to retain the workforce and to close the cybersecurity workforce shortfall required for successful operations in business and in other professional organizations that include academia, government, and industry.

Chair CAPT Glenn Hernandez, USCG (Ret.), Former USCG CISO and Senior Consultant, OpEdge Solutions

Co-ChairsCol Janel M. Nelson, USAF, Individual Mobilization Advisor (IMA) to J6 Director USSOCOM
Diana Hornberger, Deputy Dean for the College of Cyber, National Cryptologic School

 

Retain Workshop Outbrief

1:30 - 2:00 p.m.

Breakout Group Summaries
Oglethorpe Ballroom

2:00 - 2:30 p.m.

Networking Break
Oglethorpe Foyer and Plaza Lobby

2:30 - 3:00 p.m.

CTF Awards
Oglethorpe Ballroom

3:00 - 3:30 p.m.

Keynote #6
Oglethorpe Ballroom

This session will include an overview of the educational goals of the University of South Carolina with a focus on how the university will strive to enhance the academic skills, expertise, and marketability of graduating students.  Initial goals by the new President include academic excellence, more research dollars and opportunities, and increased diversity.  The President will also discuss the importance of an academic staff that continuously needs to refresh and update skills needed to help prepare students at the highest level to meet the full range of job opportunities, as well as needs by the cybersecurity workforce.

LTG Robert L. Caslen, USA (Ret.), 29th President of the University of South Carolina

3:30 - 4:00 p.m.

Wrap-up Session & Survey
Oglethorpe Ballroom

MG Neil S. Hersey, Commanding General, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence & Fort Gordon
LtGen Robert M. Shea, USMC (Ret.), President & CEO, AFCEA International

4:00 p.m.

No-Host Networking
Augustino's