Agenda

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

7:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.


8:00 a.m. – 8:15 a.m.
AFCEA WELCOME & SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW


8:15 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
PRESENTATION OF THE 2019 CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED INTELLIGENCE SERVICE

Introduction
LTG Bob Noonan, USA (Ret.) 

Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee 
Award Recipient:
Mr. Chris Inglis
Former Deputy Director, National Security Agency
 

8:45 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
KEYNOTE ONE: GREAT POWER COMPETITION AND THE NEW BATTLESPACE: A FIRESIDE CHAT WITH PETER SINGER
Peter Singer's recent books Ghost Fleet and Like War paint a picture of how autonomy and information will fundamentally transform the nature of warfare over the coming decades.  Ghost Fleet explores how advancements in autonomy, cyber, and space become differentiators in major combat operations.  Like War shows how the rise of social media is fueling a new breed of information warfare.  These non-linear enablers are central to the rise of peer adversaries.  During this talk, Singer will explore these themes in the context of the future of intelligence.

Moderator
Mr. Lewis Shepherd
Vice Chair
AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Speaker
Mr. Peter Singer, PhD
Strategist, Author &
Senior Fellow at New America


9:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS


10:15 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
SESSION ONE: THE RETURN OF GREAT POWERS
Subject matter experts explore the socio-political aspects of the return of Russia and the rise of China, comparing and contrasting their relative world views and national security strategies.  The discussion will include specific technology themes and provide mission-specific grounding for future IC and national security requirements.

Moderator
LTG Bob Noonan, USA (Ret.)
Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee 
Panelists
Senior Research Fellow, Asian Studies Center, Davis Institute for National Security and Foreign Policy
Heritage Foundation 
BG Peter Zwack, USA (Ret.)
Senior Russia -- Eurasia Fellow
National Defense University 
 

11:30 a.m. - 12:55 p.m.
LUNCH & EXHIBITS 

12:55 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
HONORING THE LEGACY OF MR. PAUL KOZEMCHAK


1:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. 
SESSION TWO: THE COCOM INTELLIGENCE PERSPECTIVE

Moderator
LTG Bon Noonan, USA (Ret.)
Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee
Panelists
Director for Intelligence, Joint Chiefs of Staff
RDML Norman Hayes, USN (Ret.)
Former Director of Intelligence, US European Command 
Brigadier Colin Karotam, Australian Army
Deputy J2, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command

2:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
SESSION THREE: RISE OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
The U.S. now finds itself in an escalating Artificial Intelligence/Machine Learning (AI/ML) arms race with peer competitors Russia and China. Vladimir Putin has stated “Whomever becomes a leader in [the artificial intelligence] sphere will be the master of the world”. Over the past two years, China has announced AI achievements that some U.S. officials fear could eclipse our own progress, at least in some military applications. AI and autonomy are crucial to the Pentagon’s Third Offset strategy. Its Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team, Project Maven, has become a “pathfinder” for this endeavor and soon we will see the stand-up of the “Joint Artificial Intelligence Center,” to coordinate AI efforts across all of DoD. Other major initiatives include ODNI AIM and DARPA’s AI Third Wave. The panel will discuss the current and projected impact of AI/ML for DOD and IC operations, the implications of the great power race in AI, and the opportunities and challenges of industry/government collaboration to advance and apply these technologies.

Moderator
Mr. Sam Gordy
General Manager, IBM Federal and Government Industries
Panelists
Mr. Ahmed Ali

Software Engineer
Google

BG Matthew Easley, USA
U.S. Army AI Task Force Director

Dr. Stephen Homeyer
Deputy Director, Research Directorate

Ms. Ingrid Solis
ODNI Senior Expert, Augmenting Intelligence Using Machines (AIM)
 

Focus Questions

  • What is the maturity of artificial intelligence/machine learning today, particularly in the context of peer nation competition?
  • Industry's role in advancing innovation in this space is crucial, but what challenges will persist or emerge regarding collaboration between industry and government in the adoption of AI and ML?
  • How do you see the pace of AI/ML investment unfolding over the near future—commercial versus government; US/Allies versus competitor states??
  • How will AI/ML and humans work together to achieve success—augmented intelligence versus artificial intelligence?
  • What does AI/ML "success" look like in 5 years? In 10 years?
     

3:45 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
STRETCH BREAK


4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
SESSION FOUR: SPACE AS A NEW FRONTIER: THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES OF PUBLICLY AVAILABLE SPACE COLLECTION
This panel will focus on the details of how the IC is planning, acquiring, and using commercial space-based capabilities.  The panel of experts will look critically at the extent to which the U.S. government is employing commercial space-based opportunities; the manner in which commercial space supports or complements Community initiatives in data management, machine intelligence, cyber, and acquisition; and, the challenges and opportunities associated with public-private partnerships in the new commercial space ecosystem. 

Moderator
Mr. Bill Webster
Senior Space Advisor
Intellispace Consulting 

Panelists
Mr. Chris DeMay

Founder and Chief Technology Officer
HawkEye 360
Mr. Ryan Lewis
Vice President and Deputy Director
In-Q-Tel CosmiQ Works
Mr. Andy Marotta
Deputy Chief, Commercial Discoveries and Assessments Office
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
Dr. David Voss
Small Satellite Portfilio, Principal Investigator
Air Force Research Laboratory
 

Focus Questions

  • What is the immediate and long-term impact of commercially available space-based intelligence collection?
  • How are IC agencies leveraging current commercial space capabilities?  What will be different in 10 years?
  • Where should defense- and IC-focused private sector organizations invest to enter, or grow, within the commercial space collection sector?
  • Describe in detail how Great Power competition is influencing commercial space collection.
  • What threats are posed by black and gray market actors?
  • Where can industry help support USG interests and/or mitigate interference with national security, defense, or law enforcement operations?

5:15 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
SYMPOSIUM RECEPTION


 

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST & EXHIBITS

8:30 a.m. - 8:35 a.m.

DAY TWO ADMINISTRATIVE ANNOUNCEMENTS AND DAY TWO WELCOME

Mr. Ray Cross 
Vice President for Intelligence
AFCEA International 

Mr. Lewis Shepherd
Vice Chair
AFCEA Intelligence Committee 

8:35 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

KEYNOTE TWO: PDDNI 

Hon. Susan Gordon
Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence
Office of the Director of National Intelligence 

 


9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS 


10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

SESSION FIVE: CYBER WARFARE
This panel will assess the current impact and efficacy of U.S. cyber operations in the context of Great Power competition, the National Defense Strategy, and the Department of Defense Cyber Strategy.  Panelists will offer their perspective on the nation’s overall cyber progress against Great Power threats, to include operational, policy, technology, and information sharing considerations.  The panel will then offer informed assessments of the nation’s most pressing cyber needs, with emphasis on private sector partnerships, to achieve desired effects and outcomes.
 

Moderator
Mr. Rick Ledgett
Former Deputy Director
National Security Agency

Panelists
Mr. George Barnes
Deputy Director
National Security Agency
Mr. Jim Richberg
National Intelligence Manager for Cyber
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Mr. Sean Roche
Associate Deputy Director of Digital Innovation
Central Intelligence Agency

Focus Questions

  • Using specific examples, please describe how your organizations are responding to Great Power competition in the cyber realm?
  • What is cyber success now and how will it change in 2 years?  In 10 years?
  • What are items on the desired cyber outcomes and capabilities “wish list?”  Are impediments policy- or technology-driven?  Where can the private sector best focus its investments to be of service to your organization's efforts?  

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. 

LUNCH & EXHIBITS 


12:15 p.m. - 1:15 p.m. 

KEYNOTE THREE: FIRESIDE CHAT WITH Mr. CHRIS SHANK
 

Moderator
Mr. Lewis Shepherd
Vice Chair
AFCEA Intelligence Committee
Speaker
Mr. Chris Shank

Director, Strategic Capabilities Office
Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering

1:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
SESSION SIX: QUANTUM COMPUTING
Over the past four years, there has been a 4x increase in the annual venture investment in quantum, publications and patents in quantum, and the number of qubits in commercial quantum computers.  This market energy points to the potential for major technological breakthroughs that could revolutionize computing and communications.  In this panel we explore how quantum speedups would fundamentally change fields such as information retrieval, modeling and simulation, optimization, and machine learning; the implications this has on the intelligence community and its missions; and how both government and industry are approaching this domain.
 

Moderator
Dr. T. Charles Clancy
Executive Director
Hume Center for National Security and Technology, Virginia Tech 
Panelists
Dr. Robert Cunningham
Chief of the Laboratory for Physical Sciences
National Security Agency
Dr. Travis Humble
Director, Quantum Computing Institute
Oak Ridge National Laboratories
Dr. Jake Taylor
Assistant Director for Quantum Information Science
White House Office of Science & Technology Policy
Dr. Robert Wisnieff
Chief Technology Officer
Quantum Computing, IBM
 

Focus Questions

  • How does quantum computing factor into the future of machine learning?
  • What is the state of quantum computing today, particularly in the context of Great Power competition?
  • What investments are required now to avoid cryptographic obsolescence due to quantum advances?
  • What does quantum "success" look like in 5 years?  In 10 years?

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP