Agenda

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

7:15 a.m. - 8:15 a.m.
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
 

Sponsored by: 


8:15 a.m. - 8:25 a.m.
WELCOME & SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW

8:25 a.m. – 8:40 a.m.
PRESENTATION OF THE 2020 CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED INTELLIGENCE SERVICE

Introduction
LTG Bob Noonan, USA (Ret.) 

Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee 

Remarks
The Honorable Michael Chertoff 


8:40 a.m. – 9:10 a.m.
THE CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD RECIPENT ADDRESS

Ms. Susan Gordon 

9:10 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
KEYNOTE ONE: PARTNERING AND INNOVATION AT CIA


10:00 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS


10:45 a.m. -12:00 p.m.
SESSION ONE: ADVANCHING NATIONAL SECURITY THROUGH IC-PRIVATE SECTOR COLLABORATION 
USIC and Private Sector representatives will explore how the Intelligence Community is advancing intelligence collection, finding new insights from mass data, and closing intelligence gaps on national security priorities through innovative joint work and technical partnerships. Through an examination of cutting-edge joint projects, the panel will provide insight on how partnerships are assisting the US in gaining national security advantage and mitigating risk, and consider common elements of success. It will also highlight the advantages afforded to IC professionals in participating in such partnerships, particularly on complex intelligence problem sets such as cyber threat to critical national infrastructure from adversarial nations. The goal of the panel is to shed light on the question “How can we enable the IC to advance its state of art through partnerships?”

Moderator
Ms. Fran Moore
Chief, Intelligence, Financial Systemic Analysis and Resilience Center

Focus Questions 

  • How are technical firms helping the IC advance collection against hard targets, protect identities, detect counterintelligence measures, make better sense of mass data, and close intelligence gaps?
  • What are the challenges to establishing and maintaining successful technical partnerships?  
  • What are common elements of success?
  • How do privacy laws and US persons issues complicate public-private partnerships?
  • How are competitive advantage concerns managed when working collaboratively with private entities?
  • What are the threats to critical national infrastructures and how does a model for private sector-US IC collaboration work?

12:00 p.m. - 1:15 p.m.
LUNCH & EXHIBITS 

1:15 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. 
KEYNOTE TWO: INNOVATION, PARTNERING, AND THE IC 


2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. 
SESSION TWO: INTELLIGENCE IN A POST-TRUTH WORLD
This panel will explore the challenges facing the IC as an evidence-based institution operating in a world where information is disseminated globally in an instant, often with little or no attribution. The IC’s mandate to provide decision advantage to warfighters and policymakers is complicated by sheer volume and by active attempts at disinformation.  During this TS/SCI conversation a group of experts from both the government and private sector will first focus on the existential aspects of today’s information environment.  The panel will then look at the practical implications for the IC-- in collection, analysis, combating misinformation, and others -- with the goal of providing attendees the background and context to understand where IC investments are most needed and most likely in addressing the information threat environment.   

Moderator 
Mr. Ahmed Ali
Strategic Executive 
Google 
Speakers 
Mr. Jason Thomas
Chief, Innovation 
Thomas Reuters Special Services
Mr. Mark W.
USG
Ms. Rebecca "Becky" Richards
Civil Liberties and Privacy Director 
National Security Agency 

Focus Questions 

  • Does truth exist in today’s world?  How is the IC responding to the current truth environment?   
  • What are the IC’s most desired outcomes to support its operations and activities in today’s information environment?  Can it maintain its relevance without achieving them?
  • What are the best practices and partnerships making an impact right now?   
  • Where are your organizations making investments to enable short-, medium-, and long term?  How are you defining success in this context?    

3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m
STRETCH BREAK


3:15 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 
KEYNOTE THREE: PARTNERING WITH THE IC- PRIVATE SECTOR PERSECTIVE 


4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
SESSION THREE: NON-TRADITIONAL COLLECTION AGAINST SOPHISTICATED ADVERSARIES
An enduring IC truism is that the sophistication of the technologies employed in a future weapon system -- threats that the IC will be tasked against -- will be improved, and perhaps radically different than those we attempt to understand today.  The resulting need is for a more sophisticated IC collection capability, such as a need to unambiguously identify these specific weapons or weapon capabilities -- often before they are ever used.  While there continues to be a vital role for conventional technical intelligence disciplines (IMINT, SIGINT, HUMINT and MASINT) in the identification and location of the more dynamic targets, we will need to employ new cross/multi-int/ integrated capabilities to meet more sophisticated threats and newer technology. 

Moderator
Mr. Gordon Issler
Riverside Research, and, Senior Advisor to the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC) Geospatial and Signatures Group Commander

Focus Questions 

  • Where are our biggest Intelligence collection gaps? Is the gap new? Old but growing?
  • What non-traditional capabilities are currently being developed to fill these gaps? Do these capabilities fit neatly in the traditional INT or functional managers responsibility? Do they span multiple Functional Managers? How long has the community been working on these innovative technologies? What are the biggest barriers and what do you believe is the road to deliver these innovations for routine analytic use?
  • Private companies are building sensors and developing analytic capability. Is the Intelligence Community able to leverage the commercial (and foreign partners) in non-traditional ways? Are there existing Policies that get in the way? If so, how would the modification of these policies improve innovation and/or reduce or add intelligence risk? 

5:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
SYMPOSIUM RECEPTION


 

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

8:15 a.m. - 8:20 a.m.
ADMINISTRATIVE ANNOUNCEMENTS & DAY TWO WELCOME

8:20 a.m. - 9:15a.m.

KEYNOTE FOUR: IC PARTMERSHIPS AND INNOVATION - THE VIEW FROM CONGRESS

 

Speakers
The Honorable Mike Rogers
The Honorable Dutch Ruppersberger


9:15 a.m. - 9:45a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS 


9:45 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

SESSION FOUR: DISTRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND THE IC 

Technology disruption affects almost every aspect of the intelligence mission, from tradecraft to enterprise operations.  Arguably the pace of disruption is increasing, necessitating greater reliance on commercial innovation for the IC to keep up.  This panel focuses on how advanced computing and artificial intelligence intersect with IC capabilities and missions with the goal of understanding how the pace of disruption impacts, motivates, and informs new approaches to S&T, partnerships, and acquisition. 

 

Focus Questions 

  • From your perspective, how are advances in computing and AI changing the IC mission?  What specific S&T programs exist to tackle challenges and opportunities in this space?
  • We often think about the role computing and AI can play in the IC’s analytic mission, but how does their adoption by adversaries make our jobs harder?
  • How does Chinese investment in everything from microelectronics to deep learning impact the state of balance among great powers?  What can the US do proactively to maintain our superiority?
  • The pace of technology change typically exceeds the pace of adoption, which further exceeds the pace of institutional and public policy changes.  To what extent is technology disruption really a people problem?  How do we rethink our institutions and policies to better match the pace of change?

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

SESSION FIVE: IC PARTNERSHIPS AND INNOVATION IN SUPPORT OF SPACE AS A WARFIGHTING DOMAIN
The establishment of USSPACECOM and the US Space Force, codified US commitment to recognizing space as a warfighting domain. As a result, the Intelligence Community will need to identify, prioritize, and advocate for the development of new capabilities, systems, specialized personnel and training, and operational design of organizations responsible for providing intelligence support to enable military and intelligence space missions. This panel will focus on the IC partnerships (interagency, foreign partners, and commercial industry) that currently exist and the future technologies/capabilities required to deter and defeat future adversarial threats in space. This panel will also identify ongoing innovation that will fuel the new space intelligence and shortfalls that still need to be overcome to outpace technological development and declared objectives of competing states. 

The panel of experts will look critically at the extent to which the U.S. government is employing commercial resources and the reliance it will place on the commercial space industry to meet critical future mission needs; the manner in which commercial space supports or complements community initiatives in data management, automation, space cyber deterrence, and technology acquisition; and, the challenges and opportunities that will arise as the US government expands its focus from operations exclusively in low earth orbit to GEO, CIS-Lunar and Lunar operations.  

Focus Questions

  • What policy and resource allocation issues will develop if U.S. policy provides space domain awareness information and extends its protections in the event of attack to commercial space services and operators?
  • Will U.S. forces have adequate intelligence to prevent and thwart attacks on key statellites?
  • What skills and capabilities will the space forces need to defend satellites from enemy lasers and missiles? What partnerships are/or would help fuel additional capabilities or innovation? What are the capabilities that we need to develop, and more importantly, how do we accommodate analyst training and the human factor on the intelligence side?
  • Private companies are building sensors and developing analytics software in the burgeoning space situational awareness, or SSA, sector. Does the US still need to loosen commercial Space Policy? How would that improve innovation?
  • Should Open Source be the first and preferred source of information (vice intelligence) to which analysts go to prosecute problems?  Should AI/ML first be applied to Open Source information before tapping classified sources?
  • One of the key conclusions of the Air Force Space Command’s workshop with NASA, NATO and private industry titled “The Future of Space 2060 and Implications for U.S. Strategy” was “The United States must increase investments in technology and develop policy and regulatory strategies.” What do you think those investments should focus on?  

12:15 p.m. - 1:00p.m.

LUNCH & EXHIBITS 

1:00 p.m. - 2:15 p.m. 

SESSION SIX: THE IMPACT OF 5G AND EMERGING INFORMATION COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES ON ESPIONAGE, ANALYSIS, AND SUPPORT
This panel will explore fact, fiction, opportunities, and threats regarding 5G and emerging ICT with a focus on how these technologies will influence, inhibit, and alter the business of espionage and intelligence.  The current roll-out of 5G wireless networks potentially offers unprecedented IC collection and surveillance capabilities against the backdrop of a global system thoroughly penetrated and compromised by threat actors. 

 

Moderator
Ms. Jill Singer
Vice President, National Security, AT&T Government Solutions and National Business

Speakers
Mr. Ray Gabany
NSA
Ms. Cindy Cama
AVP Cybersecurity, AT&T Chief Security Office 

 

Focus Questions 

  • What are the most significant vulnerabilities of the IC’s current approach to 5G and emerging ICT?
  •  What are the IC’s most inspired industry requirements to support operations and activities in this complex environment?
  • What are the partnerships that are having the most impact now? 
  • Where are your agengies making investments to enable short-,medium-, and long term results? How are you defining sucess in this context?

2:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
SESSION SEVEN: INNOVATION IN MULTI-AGENCY INITIATIVES- NEW APPROACHES IN FUNDING AND EXECUTION FOR CROSS-FUNCTIONAL IC MISSIONS
This panel will discuss the DNI’s approach to cross cutting enterprise programs and how they are being funded by traditional means. The panel will speak specifically about current and future programs that will have end-to-end mission impacts such as Bi-Statics, Identity Intelligence, and Foundational Military Intelligence (i.e. MARS).  The panel will also offer their perspective on potential future initiatives and how new programs will need to adjust existing individual agency acquisition to support the challenges that will face the IC in the future.  

Focus Questions

  • How is the DNI considering investments differently as there is increasing pressure to leverage existing investment as well as stand up new enterprise capabilities?
  • Developing acquisition planning is difficult for a vertical program within a single agency. How are these new programs changing their approach to acquisition when success will greatly depend on the capabilities provided to them by IC or DoD partners?
  • How will the DNI ensure these multi agency programs do not retreat back into the “What’s good for my agency is good for the IC” mentality?
  • Have there been any real mission successes from these joint IC programs to date? 
  • What capabilities in the future does the panel expect to see build off the current programs to transform the IC?

3:30 p.m. 
SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP