telecommunications

June 2, 2014

Verizon Business Network Services Incorporated, Ashburn, Virginia, was awarded a $10,567,483 firm-fixed-price contract for the priority telecommunication service to support the Department of Homeland Security Office of Emergency Communications. This contract has a nine-month base period and nine one-year option periods. If all options are exercised, the total cumulative contract value is $81,027,515.

May 15, 2014

Long Wave Incorporated, Oklahoma City (N39430-14-D-1422); SiteMaster Incorporated, Tulsa, Oklahoma (N39430-14-D-1423); and Shape Construction Incorporated, Bremerton, Washington (N39430-14-D-1424), are each being awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity multiple award contract for construction services for specialized antennas, towers, and communication facilities at Navy installations worldwide.

January 11, 2013
George I. Seffers

 
CENTECH Group, Falls Church, Va., is being awarded an $11,274,760 firm-fixed-price indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for operation and maintenance services of base telecommunications systems. The 99th Contracting Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., is the contracting activity. 

June 15, 2012
By George Seffers

Lockheed Martin Information Systems & Global Solutions Division, Manassas, Virginia, was awarded an indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract that includes a mix of firm-fixed-price, fixed-price with incentive, cost-plus-incentive-fee, and cost-plus and fixed-fee pricing plans. The contract is for worldwide support services necessary to carry out the day-to-day operations of Global Information Grid networks and related services, and to sustain the existing network and subsequent technology enhancement. The total cumulative face value of the contract is $1,911,000,000. The perform

November 30, 2010
By George Seffers

SBC Global Services Incorporated, Honolulu, Hawaii, is being awarded a $7 million contract to provide consolidated telecommunications services to the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Port Hueneme, California. The Port Hueneme Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center is the contracting activity.

January 2006
By Maryann Lawlor

Back in 1988 when the average price of gasoline was $1.12 a gallon, the U.S. government was selling long-distance telephone service to federal agencies for about 28 cents a minute. Over the past 18 years, however, while the cost of a gallon of gasoline has more than doubled, that same long-distance minute now costs slightly more than a penny. To enable federal agencies to take advantage of today's falling prices and rising technology, the U.S. General Services Administration later this year will award two contracts that will serve as the primary replacement for the expiring Federal Technology Service (FTS) 2001 and FTS2001 Crossover contracts.

April 1999
By Mark H. Kagan

The plethora of satellite communications options now available to ground-based users has induced one company to offer its customers a wide range of products and capabilities. This market-driven strategy addresses a growing trend in which satellite users face an expanding and confusing variety of services and providers.

April 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

One regional Bell operating company is introducing advanced telecommunications to rural communities to help people in remote locations realize the potential benefits of technology. The company provides wireline, wireless and connectivity solutions to businesses, federal agencies and military organizations both inside and outside of its 14-state region, which covers areas within the midwestern and western United States. The firm also works with many federal agencies, including the General Services Administration, the Department of the Treasury, the Internal Revenue Service and the Department of Energy, to provide voice, data and video equipment, and solutions.

April 1999
By Michelle L. Hankins

The solution for providing bandwidth on demand may be for telecommunications providers to imitate electric companies. Treating bandwidth as a utility is an approach that one major telecommunications provider believes could be the communications wave of the future. By ordering bandwidth as needed via a new communications system, users could extend or cut back their capabilities and pay only for what they use. For the military, which often needs to increase capabilities during an exercise, the technology allows this increase in use without installation of additional or bigger lines that could stand unused most of the time.

July 1999
By Maryann Lawlor

The same wires that carry voice transmissions to individual telephones within an organization are now delivering data, television-quality video and stereo-quality sound directly to the desktop. This allows businesses and agencies to provide multipoint videoconferencing, video-broadcast and video-on-demand capabilities to employees without installing additional infrastructures or overloading existing information technology components or networks.

April 2000
By Clarence A. Robinson, Jr.

Powerful forces of private-sector competition and an onslaught of technical advances are propelling the United States into a telecommunications renaissance era. In every sector-wireless, wireline, local and long distance, video and Internet-more services are being delivered at lower prices and higher bandwidth.

April 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

As militaries, governments and businesses continue to struggle with the obstacles posed by bandwidth limitations, scientists in industry and research laboratories are improving compression technologies to allow high-quality images and text to be sent to the desktop-or palmtop-with phenomenal speed. The proposition is simple: Until scientists design a way to make the communications pipelines larger, engineers must make the volume of data smaller.

April 2000
By Maryann Lawlor

Telecommunication technologies allow people to reach out and touch someone in ways that were unimaginable just a few years ago. No longer restricted to voice-only transmissions, consumers are using the metal and fiber veins that run throughout the world to send data, images and even multimedia presentations worldwide. Companies that develop the technology and services that facilitate these connections are watching opportunities blossom. More importantly, they are fighting hard to stay ahead of a game in which ignoring a chance to provide in-demand services means handing your competitor the advantage.

March 2001
By Christian B. Sheehy

A new type of optical networking software will enable bandwidths of light to be redistributed in response to fluctuating data traffic. The technology allows individual streams of photons to be moved when and where they are needed, ensuring greater network reliability and near real-time communication.

March 2001
By Henry S. Kenyon

As the United States and the European Union begin to implement policies designed to open their markets to foreign competition, issues such as wireless spectrum allocation, telephone interconnections and Internet access continue to vex negotiations. While both parties understand the importance of free trade and cooperation, these differences may impede bilateral trade liberalization and deregulation.

April 2002
By Henry S. Kenyon

After considerable interagency debate, the U.S. government has approved ultrawideband radio technology for commercial use. Ultrawideband devices operate across a wide spectrum range instead of a specific frequency. This allows for more efficient spectrum use at lower power levels and presents a possible solution for bandwidth-starved wireless providers. Other applications include ground-penetrating radar, imaging, surveillance and medical systems. However, issues such as possible interference with navigation and commercial aviation systems must be resolved before the technology gains wider acceptance.

April 2002
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Internet protocol revolution is reaching satellite video communications with a new system that permits transmitting tens of thousands of channels over a single orbital transponder. Users can leapfrog existing satellite video limitations with two-way virtual private networks that can carry streaming video without a hitch.

April 2002
By Maryann Lawlor

Although industry shoulders the ultimate responsibility for the health and well-being of the U.S. telecommunications infrastructure, the federal government is working to ensure the continued operation of systems that touch almost every aspect of life-from emergency services to economic stability. Key among the government's concerns are the security and reliability of the systems on which national security and emergency preparedness depend.

Marach 2003
By Henry S. Kenyon

Manufacturers are poised to release new equipment that will permit universal roaming for cellular telephone and mobile devices. Recent processor and software developments are leading to products that can operate across different global communications protocols.

March 2003
By Robert K. Ackerman

Emergency responders now can count on priority cellular access in a pinch as the U.S. government establishes a wireless version of its Government Emergency Telecommunications Service. Known as the Wireless Priority System, or WPS, the new cellular system promises connectivity in a shirt pocket for authorized users ranging from the president down to a local fire chief.

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