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SOCOM

Diverse Special Operations Missions Mandate Diverse Networking

May 13, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The U.S. Special Operations Command is taking an unconventional approach to equipping its forces for an information environment that does not follow conventional guidelines. The command must provide networking for a theater force that can range from one person up through thousands of people, and it faces diverse mission needs that can require large communications pipes.

Special Ops Hunts for Psyops Tool

August 26, 2013

The U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) is seeking radio broadcast systems that can search for and acquire every AM and FM radio station in a region and then broadcast a message across the specific area. This capability would be used to share information simultaneously with residents in locations where unrest or natural or manmade disasters make it difficult to communicate. The synchronous over-broadcast system must be lightweight, able to operate on multiple frequencies and demonstrated at a technology readiness level 8 or higher.

To propose their secure communications system, companies must submit a summary outline not to exceed five pages that describes the performance specifications. Submissions must include name, address, phone and fax numbers, and email address for all points of contact.

This is a sources sought announcement only. If SOCOM decides to acquire one of the proposed systems, a pre-award synopsis will be posted on FedBizOpps.gov to pursue procurement.

Marine Corps Ponders Training Changes

April 1, 2013
By Max Cacas

After a special operations deployment, handling state-of-the-art communications technology tops the list.

Back from a nearly year-long deployment to Afghanistan, the 1st Marine Special Operations Battalion already is working to apply lessons learned to training for the next deployment. As the battalion prepares for its next mission, it is reflecting on what its Marines learned about how they train, how their equipment worked and how they will prepare themselves for the future.

While they are able to use some of the best electronic communications gear developed for the military, the Marines nonetheless are trying to learn how they can improve both their initial and follow-up training to get the most out of that equipment. They also are asking important questions about whether they have enough, and the right kinds, of equipment.

Chief Warrant Officer 2 (CWO2) Jason Reed, USMC, is a spectrum operations officer, G-6, and one of the members of the Marine battalion responsible for supporting the communications needs of Marines during the deployment. CWO2 Reed says one of the first things his bosses at the Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command (MARSOC) headquarters wanted to know is what worked, what went well and, more importantly, what needed improvement based on the deployment. For CWO2 Reed, that meant one thing: training for combat service support personnel.

He explains that MARSOC recruits Marines who have already received training for more conventional duties. “They’re radio operators, they’re maintenance folks, they’re cryptologists, they’re data network operators,” CWO2 Reed outlines. Upon arrival at MARSOC, however, the Marines receive a new level of training to support Special Operations, getting what he calls “a new baseline” in training.

JSOC Gains Clark as Deputy Commander, SOCOM

April 3, 2012
By Beverly Schaeffer

Brig. Gen. Stephen A. Clark, USAF, has been assigned deputy commander, Joint Special Operations Command, U.S. Special Operations Command, Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

SOCOM Network Needs

August 24, 2011
By Henry Kenyon

The commander of U.S. Special Operations Command shares background about his organization, how they use communications and why, and what the command needs now.

Operators, Industry Guide Special Forces Acquisition

July 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman, SIGNAL Magazine

Special operations forces are looking to the commercial communications marketplace for their next generation of information systems and solutions. However, the U.S. Special Operations Command’s ability to tap commercial off-the-shelf systems is proving more difficult as its needs become more complex.

Special Operations Has Special Networking Needs

July 2011
By Rita Boland, SIGNAL Magazine

The J-6 and chief information officer of the U.S. Special Operations Command may not be an international man of mystery, but he does have multiple roles that aid sensitive operations. Unlike similar positions at other U.S. combatant commands, the leader in charge of communications for special forces manages his own network and a discretionary budget. The result is a unique situation that enables quick responses to warfighters’ needs.

Special Operations Command Awards Nearly $85 Million Enterprise Contract

March 18, 2011
By George Seffers

L3 STRATIS, Reston, Virginia, was awarded a nearly $85 million contract for Special Operations Forces Information Technology Enterprise Contracts distributed computing management services (DCMS) in support of U.S. Special Operations Command (USSOCOM). The contractor will assist the government in performing the daily operations necessary to facilitate U.S. SOCOM's ongoing ability to effectively and efficiently optimize delivery and performance of DCMS to sustain and maintain U.S. SOCOM's global enterprise information technology distributed computing environment. U.S. SOCOM is the contracting activity.

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