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NSA Procures KNOX Smartphones

October 24, 2014

General Dynamics C4 Systems, Scottsdale, Arizona, recently received the Defense Mobile Classified Capability (DMCC) contract from the National Security Agency (NSA). As part of the contract, General Dynamics will deliver up to 1,000 Samsung KNOX-enabled Galaxy S4 smartphones provisioned with added GD Protected software for the U.S. government. With these new smartphones, authorized government personnel will be able to make secure phone calls and access classified email. With GD Protected software, the phone operates using only authorized software and applications from a trusted source. The company will provide system updates and upgrades over the air. The GD Protected Samsung KNOX Galaxy S4 smartphones will also include government-approved mobile device management from Mobile Iron and secure voice from CellCrypt.

DARPA Awards Mobile Edge Networking to SAIC

January 20, 2012
By George Seffers

Science Applications International Corporation, McLean, Virginia, is being awarded a $7,949,078 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract. The contractor will provide a flexible smartphone mobile ad-hoc network, associated development, and test framework to ensure successful integration and validation of content-based mobile edge networking technology developer solutions. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is the contracting activity.

Target Tracking Smartphones

November 30, 2011
By George Seffers

Engineers from the University of Missouri College of Engineering, with funding from the U.S. Army/Leonard Wood Institute, are in the early stages of enhancing popular smartphones to be able to find and track military targets. The goal is to provide the exact location of a remote target, through either sound or sight using the technology available on commercial phones. The software application could be useful in cases where tracking lasers would be visible to the enemy. Soldiers could one day use the application to photograph a target and relay the Global Positioning System location without relying on the Internet.

The researchers also developed a sound-based localization method for dark or urban environments. A group of soldiers could record a sound and share it, and software would allow the soldiers to determine the location of the sound source. The technology could also be used for non-military applications. Emergency responders, for example, can identify a location or direct traffic, and tourists could identify unfamiliar objects or buildings.

Federal Agency Keys In to Secure Mobile Phones

November 4, 2011
By Beverly Schaeffer

The National Security Agency is working to develop its own secure mobile phone architecture-using commercial off-the-shelf technologies only.

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