MIT Lincoln Laboratory

January 9, 2017
Perdix microdrones launched from F/A-18 Super Hornets demonstrate advanced swarming capabilities, including collective decision making, adaptive formation flying and self-healing.

The U.S. Defense Department announced today that in October 2016 it successfully demonstrated one of the world’s largest microdrone swarms at China Lake, California. The demonstration consisted of 103 Perdix drones launched from three F/A-18 Super Hornets. The microdrones demonstrated advanced swarm behaviors such as collective decision making, adaptive formation flying and self-healing.  

The Naval Air Systems Command and the Strategic Capabilities Office (SCO) are partnering on the effort. Secretary of Defense Ash Carter created the SCO in 2012 to boost Defense Department innovation.

April 28, 2015

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been awarded a $3,061,852,854 indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the operation of the Lincoln Laboratory Federally Funded Research and Development Center. Contractor will apply advanced technology to problems of national security. Research and development activities focus on long-term technology development as well as rapid system prototyping and demonstration. Work will be performed in Lexington, Massachusetts, and is expected to be complete by March 31, 2020. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition.

March 20, 2015

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been awarded a $1,734,516,083 modification (P00538) for the operation of the Lincoln Laboratory. This modification prevents a break in service for all research and development projects under the subject contract. Work will be performed at Lexington, Massachusetts, and is expected to be complete by March 31, 2018. This contract is incrementally funded; additional funds are not being obligated at time of award. The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, is the contracting activity (FA8721-05-C-0002).

November 30, 2011
By George Seffers

Recent flight tests conducted by a combined team from the Electronic Systems Center, the Space and Missile Systems Center, MIT Lincoln Laboratory and MITRE Corp. have shown that the low-profile Advanced Multi-band Communications Antenna, installed on a wide-body aircraft, can effectively support high speed Ka-band and extremely high frequency (EHF) communications. The tests demonstrated that the antenna system meets needed performance characteristics, such as small size and weight, easy installation, consistent coverage in all directions and the ability to mount to the aircraft skin.