China

July 1, 2015
By Adm. James Stavridis, USN (Ret.)

China is flexing its muscles and expanding its reach, particularly in the maritime domain. As the United States tries to consolidate the so-called pivot to Asia by bringing 60 percent of the U.S. fleet to bear, leaders need to be thinking through all their other options to deal with the growing ambition of the People’s Republic of China.

June 1, 2015
By James C. Bussert
A new Chinese littoral combat ship, or C-LCS, bears a striking resemblance to the U.S. Navy’s USS Independence, LCS-2, shown in the next photo. China has introduced new classes of catamarans and trimarans for coastal operations./ Photo courtesy www.sharkhunters.com

China is introducing designs for catamarans—and even trimarans—that seem destined to serve as the country’s littoral combat ships. Some of the trimarans closely resemble their U.S. counterparts, although differences—some quite interesting—do exist.

February 1, 2015
By James C. Bussert

While infocentric nations and military forces focus on the threat to their systems from malware-wielding cyber attackers, a significant danger to cyberspace may come from outer space in the form of kinetic weapons that attack vital satellites.

September 22, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

The growing customer list for defense intelligence is blurring traditional lines of distinction among activities and missions.

September 19, 2014
By Robert K. Ackerman

Other threats to the United States may make daily headlines, but space and cyberspace are below the public radar while at the top of many lists of concerns.

Brig. Gen. Mark W. Gillette, USA, has been assigned defense attaché-China, U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, China.

January 31, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

The People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) is serving as the primary vehicle to extend China’s influence deeper away from its borders. New and improved capabilities have transformed the navy into a force that can take on increasingly complex and distant military roles.

January 31, 2013
By Robert K. Ackerman

As the People’s Republic of China grows in economic and military stature, it is generating ill will among neighbors who increasingly fear an expansionist budding superpower. Ironically, the greatest effect this is having on the Asia-Pacific region is that it is driving many nations into the arms of the United States.

This was just one of many observations offered by a panel on China at AFCEA/USNI West 2013 in San Diego. A mix of academics and military officers offered different perspectives on where China might be headed in the coming years.

January 26, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

The dynamic modernization of China's economy and society may owe more to momentum than careful planning. Dr. Xinjun Zhang, associate professor of public international law, Tsinghua University, Beijing, offered that he believes that China does not have a vision guiding the massive changes that define China today. Zhang offered that China's current policies have emerged from Deng Xiaoping's approaches, which he implied were a bit too pragmatic. Speaking at a policy panel that included former U.S. Pacific Command head Adm. Timothy J.

January 26, 2011
By Robert K. Ackerman

China and the United States are plagued by a "strategic mistrust" that hinders relations between the two. That statement was made by Adm. Timothy J. Keating, USN (Ret.), former commander of the U.S. Pacific Command, in a panel discussion with Dr. Xinjun Zhang, associate professor of public international law, Tsinghua University, Beijing, that was moderated by former Good Morning America host David Hartman. To the audience, that strategic mistrust was evident in the exchange of comments between Zhang and Adm. Keating throughout the panel.

May 11, 2010
By Rachel Eisenhower

Tuesday morning's panel at Joint Warfighting 2010 examined how the cards are being stacked when it comes to global power. Some of them aren't falling exactly where one might think. As these issues progress, will it force more cooperation with powers like China?

November 4, 2009
By Robert K. Ackerman

China and the United States are constantly redefining their relationship in a dynamic that could lead to conflict if both sides are not careful, according to a leading U.S. Asia-Pacific expert.