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February 2010

Distributed Essential Services Can Introduce Stability in Uncertain Lands

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Linton Wells II

The U.S. government is systematically missing opportunities to contribute to stability, reconstruction and development around the world. These goals are achievable by leveraging reliable communications, enabled by stable power, to provide capabilities and services that local populations value and can sustain with their own resources.

Revisiting Homeland Security—Again

February 2010
By Kent R. Schneider

No, the title is not a redundancy. Given all the recent events in homeland security, it appears the whole process will undergo yet another round of reviews. I don’t think any of us would question that security is better today than in 2001. But is it good enough? Probably not.

Air Force Research Aims at Undefined Future

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

The future air battlespace may be dominated by unmanned aerial vehicles fully networked to exchange sensor information and battle damage assessments. They could be controlled remotely by human pilots or guided by autonomous programming that allows them to change their objective mid-mission like a flock of birds suddenly changing direction. Similarly, they might trade off capabilities to ensure mission success if one or more fails or is destroyed.

Washington D.C. Police Confront Homeland Security Challenges

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Robert K. Ackerman

The Metropolitan Police Department of Washington, D.C., is accelerating its implementation and use of information technology to meet the terrorist threat that looms over the U.S. capital. This includes adapting everyday police technologies for homeland security and counterterrorism operations, and it also involves bringing in new capabilities from the civil and private sectors.

Research in the Final Frontier

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Rita Boland

Nestled deep inside NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston is the Defense Department’s Human Spaceflight Payloads Office, where a team of personnel strives to find rides into space for military experiments. Tests that affect defense, security and commercial interests route through the office in the hopes of making it aboard a manned mission off the planet. The work in the office is only part of a program that aims to place as many research projects into space as possible. Successes from the experiments range from technologies now in everyday use to products that save lives on the battlefield.

Good Guys Share, Bad Guys Lose

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Rita Boland

Law enforcement personnel are employing a new system that enables them to connect the dots between seemingly unrelated data in an unprecedented manner. The technology correlates information from various databases, allowing users to learn more about subjects of interest than they could with previous methods. Each increment of the system’s deployment offers additional information fields and introduces new tools.

Military Branch Undertakes Massive Troop Conversion

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Rita Boland

The U.S. Air Force has completed its largest-ever communications specialty code transformation and one of its largest-ever personnel changes. Tens of thousands of enlisted airmen, as well as thousands of civilians, migrated from traditional communications job codes to new cyber job codes. The change creates the emphasis necessary for success in the cyberspace domain and will affect all Air Force operations.

Cybersecurity Garners Attention

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Maryann Lawlor

Cyberspace is the new frontier and is fraught with all the excitement and peril that come with it. Opportunities for innovation and prosperity abound. Unfortunately, like the challenges faced by explorers who settled the New World, the dangers and unknown threats lurking throughout the world online are often difficult to identify and fend off.

Technology Rockets Polish Economy

Tuesday, February 02, 2010
By Maryann Lawlor

A combination of European Union investments and transformational uses for computers is making Poland one of the fastest growing information technology markets in the Central and Eastern European region. Although some Polish companies are deferring information systems purchases to cut expenditures, the country is still expected to experience a more than 30 percent jump in the size of this market between last year’s final figures and 2013. A great deal of this growth will be the result of new government programs; however, at least some of the economic boom can be attributed to how attractive Poland has become as a home for electronics companies headquartered in other countries.

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