December 2012

December 4, 2012
By Rita Boland

Military activities in the Asia-Pacific region have become more focused since the release of a defense strategy a few months ago that places renewed attention on the global area. Through U.S. Pacific Command's (PACOM's) recent theater campaign plan, leaders are telling the subordinate military-service components to report back in a year on how efforts are working while deconflicting duplicate programs.

December 1, 2012
By Paul A. Strassmann

A few staff experts can formulate new strategies in a short time. Over the years, the U.S. Defense Department has accumulated a large collection of long-range planning documents. However, none of the plans ever was fully implemented, as new administrations kept changing priorities.

The just announced Defense Department Cloud Computing Strategy presents a long list of radically new directions. Ultimately, it will take hundreds of thousands of person-years to accomplish what has been just outlined. Several points stand out.

December 1, 2012
By Kent R. Schneider

In our professional lives, most of us have not seen an economic environment or a budget climate such as those we face today. We are approaching the ramp-down of the longest period of continuous conflict in U.S. and allied history. Technology is changing at an unprecedented pace, and to help address budget declines, we are relying on some of these technological advances—enterprise networking and service approaches, cloud computing, data center consolidation, more effective cybersecurity and better use of mobility solutions. The U.S.

December 1, 2012
By Kent R. Schneider

Similarities outnumber differences as allies compare challenges.

The past 11 years have seen a sea change in intelligence operations and challenges in both Europe and North America, as longtime allies have had to confront a new era in global security issues. Both the United States and European NATO members have discovered that they face many of the same challenges, some of which must be addressed together by all members of the Atlantic alliance.

December 1, 2012
Reviewed by Dr. R. Norris Keeler

Book By Norman Polmar and Michael White (U.S. Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Maryland 2010, 238 pages)

December 1, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman
This experimental antenna developed by LGS Innovations mimics a spherical antenna by arraying circuit boards bearing printed structures. Without having a series of electrical connections, the boards nonetheless resonate as if the construct was a spherical antenna.

Scientists bend, not break, the laws of physics.

Faced with limitations imposed by physics, laboratory researchers are generating antenna innovations by tweaking constructs to change the rules of the antenna game. Their efforts do not seek to violate long-held mathematical theorems or laws of physics. Instead, they are working to find lawful ways of working around limitations that long have inhibited the development of antennas that would suit user needs with fewer tradeoffs.

December 1, 2012
By Max Cacas
The Argos multiple-antenna array prototype combines 64 standard cellphone antennas into one base station that can send data directly to 16 different devices at the same time.

Beamforming could help increase capacity of cellphone networks 
to meet the demands of data-hungry smartphones and tablets.

December 1, 2012
By Rita Boland

Academic investigations are establishing the future
 of transmission technology for troops and civilians.

Improving antennas for defense or commercial purposes has as much to do with mathematics as it does with hardware. Researchers in the Wireless Networking and Communications Group at the University of Texas at Austin are exploring algorithms along with other properties that should improve communications systems on the battlefield.

December 1, 2012
By George I. Seffers
Future armored vehicles could include antennas integrated into the armor coating and other technologies designed to rid the service of whip antennas.

U.S. Army officials

 seek to replace the

 commonly used 
device.

December 1, 2012
By George I. Seffers
Three 100-foot towers at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, provide the Air Force Research Laboratory Sensors Directorate with new capabilities to perform radar research. The actual radars atop each tower were relocated from Rome, N.Y., as part of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure.

U.S. Air Force researchers use 3-D printers and
 other cutting-edge concepts 
to create
 the next 
innovations.

There is no Moore’s Law for antennas because size reduction and performance improvement will always be subject to the limitations imposed by electromagnetic physics and material properties. But steady advances in computer technologies, such as electromagnetic modeling and simulation and 3-D printing, enable antenna technology researchers to push the limits of possibility on behalf of the warfighters.

December 1, 2012
By Rita Boland

Through a foreign military
 sales program that sends ocean vessels to Iraq, officials hope to facilitate stability in the area.

December 1, 2012
By Robert K. Ackerman
U.S. Marines communicate digitally over a network. The Next Generation Enterprise Network, or NGEN, will take a new approach to networking yet evolve from the existing Navy Marine Corps Intranet.

The program may be revolutionary, but its product is evolutionary.

Despite its sea-change approach to acquisition, the U.S. Navy’s Next Generation Enterprise Network program is being designed to evolve from its predecessor, the Navy Marine Corps Intranet, in bids submitted by the two teams vying for the multibillion-dollar contract. The two bidders are focusing their efforts on the transition between the two networks, which is a process that will take several years.

December 1, 2012
By George I. Seffers
Vice Adm. Kendall Card, USN, deputy chief of naval operations for information dominance and director of naval intelligence, once commanded the USS Abraham Lincoln, during combat operations and in support of tsunami relief efforts in Sumatra, Indonesia.

The U.S. Navy is on a course designed to rule the information arena.

With information operations growing increasingly critical to combat operations, the United States cannot afford to be anything less than number one in the data wars. And the U.S. Navy is implementing several measures to ensure information dominance. Measures include dramatically reducing the number of data centers and legacy networks, further developing the Information Dominance Corps and building an unmanned vehicle capable of being launched from sea

December 1, 2012
By Max Cacas
LASR director Alan Schultz engages one of the lab's humanoid robots in the Prototyping High Bay.

A new facility allows scientists to test innovations 
for autonomous and unmanned systems.

A new manmade realm allows robots to learn how to scale sheer cliff walls, go from the ocean to the beach or cross hot, burning desert sands. In this environment, researchers can examine the machines’ every move and how they interact with human warfighters. And one day, these robots also may help save sailors’ lives at sea.