January 2005

January 2005

Rear Adm. (Sel.) Craig E. Bone, USCG, chief of staff, 14th Coast Guard District, elaborates on the diverse challenges facing his service.Rear Adm. (Sel.) Craig E. Bone, USCG, chief of staff, 14th Coast Guard District, elaborates on the diverse challenges facing his service.Warfighting across half the globe requires partners that interoperate.

January 2005
By Alan C. Wade, Chief Information Officer, U.S. Intelligence Community

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

Emerging technologies are essential to the Intelligence Community’s ability to accomplish its international mission in the high-threat environment of the 21st century. In the global war against terrorism, the United States faces foes who are clever, patient, determined, multinational and largely invisible against the backdrop of the societies in which they operate. The nation’s ability to counteract this threat demands broad connectivity, speed of action and the management of large volumes of information at levels unparalleled in history.

January 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
Two U.S. Air Force airmen call in air support during coalition combat operations in Fallujah, Iraq, late last year. Network-centric operations are producing results already in Iraq, but key decisions lie ahead for the defensewide concept to achieve its full potential.
New challenges emerge as technology reaches warfighters.

January 2005
By Col. Alan D. Campen, USAF (Ret.)

It’s the evil them versus the inept us.

Today’s threats to U.S. national security range from the bloody reality of terrorist suicide bombers who kill and maim individuals to weapons of mass destruction that potentially hold many thousands at risk. The U.S. information infrastructure is a vital element of U.S. national security, but the design and management of software render its terminals, nodes and networks demonstrably vulnerable to malicious manipulation.

January 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Dust Networks developed the SmartMesh architecture that features miniature communications nodes to form a self-healing mesh network of sensors that collect and transmit information. Each node is approximately the size of a postage stamp.
Applications for tiny sensor packages sure to grow as technology develops.

January 2005
By Cheryl Lilie

 
Each module in the crystalline robot system attaches to another using a key and lock mechanism. This two-dimensional system moves and alters its shape across the plane by expanding and contracting, but it cannot move vertically.
Linked arm in arm, they march up mountains and crawl through tunnels.

January 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

Concept improves connectivity between individual warfighters.

Networking capabilities that increase situational awareness are moving down the chain of command and eliminating bottlenecks in data sharing. Work underway on the Pathfinder advanced concept technology demonstration aims at integrating capabilities so that information gathered by unmanned ground vehicles, unmanned aerial vehicles and unattended ground sensors can be distributed within a mobile, self-forming, self-healing network. The system is designed for use by special operations and lightweight conventional forces in small team operations.

January 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

Over the past three years, AFCEA International has undergone several changes, both internally and externally. Some of these changes reflected the new world that we faced after the September 11, 2001, attacks. Others were a part of the internal activities that a dynamic organization undergoes to remain vibrant. The next three years hold more changes in store for the association, and they promise to be as important as those of the recent past.

By Robert K. Ackerman

 
It’s easier than you think; large and small companies do it all the time.

Many would-be contractors sabotage their own bids with sloppy processes and mistaken notions that leave government acquisition officials no choice but to reject them for a contract award. These mistakes can run the gamut from firms’ attempts to pull the wool over the eyes of government officials to honest errors that bidders do not realize are hurting their cause.

January 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

Improved sales to drive industry in 2005, but new technologies challenge established pricing schemes.

After several years of depressed revenues, the telecommunications industry is poised to recover in 2005, experts say. Rebounding from the historic lows of the past several years, the equipment manufacturing sector can expect robust growth while gains for services will remain modest. But storm clouds loom on the horizon as emerging technologies such as broadband and voice over Internet protocol threaten to radically change traditional service carrier arrangements.

January 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security is using RFID technologies to monitor the integrity of seals on shipping containers and to scan electronic manifests to determine their contents.
Logistics management capability poised for widespread use.