November 2005

November 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

 
The collapsible metal air battery was developed to meet the needs of South Korea’s special operations forces. The device is used to charge radio batteries and as an emergency power source for electronics systems such as personal digital assistants and notebook computers.
Reusable energy source allows soldiers to recharge batteries, run equipment in the field.

November 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

November 2005
By Cdre. Robert Howell, RN (Ret.)

 
Panelists discussing industrial linkages with NATO policy and procedures at the ACT Industry Day conference include (l-r) Aaron Fuller, Computer Sciences Corporation; Scott Harris, Lockheed Martin; Dr. Stefan Zoller, European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company; and Dr. Burkhard Theile, Rheinmetall DETEC.
Both cooperation and independent activities may be key.

November 2005
Brig. Gen. Susan S. Lawrence, USA, Chief Information Officer and Director, Command, Control, Communications and Computers, J-6, U.S. Central Command

Which emerging technology will have the biggest impact on your organization in the future?

November 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 

Members of the U.S. Pacific Air Force (PACAF) Network Operations and Security Center (NOSC) provide operational availability, enterprise management and information assurance to bases across the Asia-Pacific region. Recent work with Dell Incorporated improved help desk processes so that data about problems could be analyzed faster and serious network issues could be identified.

November 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

November 2005
By Henry S. Kenyon

November 2005
By Adm. Leighton W. Smith Jr., USN (Ret.)

Data analysis continues to prove difficult in multilevel security realm.

Accredited, tested solutions could allow military decision makers and intelligence analysts to access information and make decisions simultaneously using information that resides in multiple security classifications. However, although the U.S. Defense Department is moving forward to address information-sharing challenges, it has encountered difficulties in proving and certifying these technologies in a testbed environment.

November 2005
By Robert K. Ackerman

 
A U.S. Navy petty officer 2nd class communicates on his radio during an exercise in Guam. The island’s Army National Guard has established a new communications network built on the back of a buried Navy fiber optic Sonet ring.
Typhoons must be no obstacle to connectivity in a territory that is increasing in importance.

November 2005
By Vice Adm. Herbert A. Browne, USN (Ret.)

The recent disasters caused by hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the GulfCoast of the United States laid bare many long-overlooked facts. Among them is the importance of local communications interoperability. From individuals at home to emergency responders operating on a national scale, communications connectivity is vital during a crisis. The communications shortcomings experienced during that series of disasters contributed to the difficulties faced by the populace.

November 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
The combined air operations center located in southwest Asia is one element of network-centric operations in current operations. The Office of Force Transformation is coordinating a series of case studies to evaluate how network centricity affects warfare.
Increased information sharing saves lives, supports calculated risk taking.

November 2005
By Maryann Lawlor

 
Members of the 13th Air Support Operations Squadron launch an AN/PRC-148 payload during test flights prior to the Combat SkySat demonstration in March. The tests helped determine the ideal operational altitudes for the radios.
Extended connectivity emerges out of thin air.

November 2005
By Jeff Hawk

 
The Early Entry Deployment Support Kit (EEDSK) can be deployed on supply ships to help track the delivery and distribution of equipment.
Satellite link could help logisticians remotely troubleshoot vehicle malfunctions.