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January 1, 2022
By Dr. Scott Jasper and Master Sgt. Travis Hollingshead, USMC
Marine Corps Tactical Systems Support Activity trains Marines on networking on-the-move.  Sky Laron, Marine Corps Systems Command

A new concept is necessary to maneuver forces, potentially with small and scalable autonomous organizations operating independently of one another. The concept, called Expeditionary Advanced Base Operations, is being explored and instituted for Naval Expeditionary Forces to fight in this manner. The challenge is in defending expeditionary networks in a mosaic warfare distribution to avoid the big problem of information advantage loss faced in a recent wargame.

January 1, 2022
By Kimberly Underwood
The NSA’s National Cryptologic School is increasing its cyber education programs and grants to reach more middle school students and children in rural and underservedareas in the United States.  Shutterstock/Monkey Business Images

The U.S. National Security Agency/Central Security Service’s National Cryptologic School is expanding its reach of cyber education programs. The school’s Center for Education, Innovation and Outreach has many cyber-related programs supporting elementary, middle school, high school, college and graduate students. Although it has made great headway in its established programs, the National Security Agency is still working to provide cyber education to underserved regions in the United States.

January 1, 2022
By George I. Seffers
Evacuees load on to a United Arab Emirates (UAE) Boeing C-17 Globemaster III during the evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Kabul, Afghanistan, August 2021. The office of the Joint Staff J-6 initiated Project Orsus to overcome data challenges associated with the evacuation and say that project will likely impact the future of joint all-domain command and control.  U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Samuel Ruiz

Last year’s evacuation of civilians from Afghanistan was a massive undertaking with multiple challenges and successes. The withdrawal required enormous amounts of data, which also presented some obstacles, but ultimately proved successful and offered lessons learned for future operations, according to U.S. Defense Department officials.

January 1, 2022
By J.D. Canclini
Technological solutions like the Defense Department’s combat cloud are important, but how such technologies are operationalized will be key to 6G network defense.  Shutterstock/Fit Ztudio

The spate of 2021’s high-profile cyber attacks has caused policymakers and practitioners to seriously reevaluate the state of security for U.S. critical infrastructure and key resources. From the unprecedented SolarWinds supply-chain infiltration to the Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack to the most recent allegations of Chinese state actors infiltrating tens of thousands of Microsoft Exchange mail servers, the scale and scope of cyber attacks against public and private U.S. networks are only worsening. As 5G—and eventually 6G—moves to increasingly meshed networks, the challenge of network defense only grows.

January 1, 2022
By George I. Seffers
A team leader with 1st Battalion, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, directs movements of his team using the Harris Leader Radio during an assault on an objective during the initial operating test for the system. The rapid development and fielding of cutting-edge systems help drive the need for agility and adaptability at Army signal and cyber schools.  Nicholas Robertson, U.S. Army Operational Test Command Visual Information Specialist

The U.S. Army’s massive modernization effort requires rapid adaptability in the courses being taught in its cyber and signal schools. Efforts are underway to fundamentally change the approach to teaching and instituting courses for zero trust, cloud computing and other technology advances that will affect the future of combat.

January 1, 2022
By Robert K. Ackerman
Educating and training people in cybersecurity will require a broader reach in both personnel and material.  Andrey Suslov/Shutterstock

The changing nature of threats and countermeasures cries out for new perspectives in cybersecurity, commercial experts say. Training and education must assume greater variety, but trainees also must be chosen from diverse backgrounds to provide new perspectives on threats and potential solutions.

January 1, 2022
By Dan Smith
Telemetry is the use of automation to manage communications across multiple data sources and speed the detection of threats.  Frame Stock Footage/Shutterstock

Across the federal government, agencies are dealing with an explosion of cybersecurity data from new sensors, hyper-scale cloud infrastructure, microservices and a geographically distributed workforce—and the pace shows no sign of slowing.

Automation drives the ability for agencies to process and analyze these massive workloads, but if not deployed and managed with proper expertise, they can add complexity and risk.

December 9, 2021
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Building on the success of the first round of prototype awards of the Information Warfare Research Project (IWRP), the Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic and the Naval Information Warfare Systems Command (NAVWAR) will be pursuing up to $500 million of projects under IWRP round two. Credit: NAVWAR Illustration by Wendy M. Jamieson

The Naval Information Warfare Center Atlantic, on behalf of the Naval Information Warfare Systems Command, announced on December 7 that it had awarded an other transaction agreement to Advanced Technology International (ATI) to manage its second Information Warfare Research Project, or IWRP 2. Based in Summerville, South Carolina, ATI will perform consortium management for the IWRP, handling research funding up to $500 million under a five-year period of performance.

December 1, 2021
Posted by: George I. Seffers
The director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency announced the appointment of 23 members of the agency’s new Cybersecurity Advisory Committee. Credit: Gorodenkoff/Shutterstock

Jen Easterly, director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), announced today the appointment of the first 23 members of the agency’s new Cybersecurity Advisory Committee, a group that will advise and provide recommendations to the director on policies, programs, planning, and training to enhance the nation’s cyber defense.

December 1, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
Implementation of zero-trust security will require users to adopt new security measures and attitudes. Credit: metamorworks/Shutterstock

The human factor looms as the most imposing challenge to implementing zero-trust security, say experts. Aspects of this factor range from cultural acceptance to training, and sub-elements such as organizations and technologies also will play a role. Ultimately, change will have to come from the top of an organization to be truly effective.

All security measures depend to a large degree on human cooperation, but that is only part of the picture for zero trust. Its implementation will entail a massive change in security procedures both for users and for network architects. And, the ability to share information across organizational boundaries will be strongly affected at all government levels.

December 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Officials across the U.S. government are releasing guidance documents and assisting departments and agencies in the adoption of zero-trust cybersecurity architectures. The OMB is considered the team captain for zero trust, and the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency within the DHS is compiling lessons learned for inclusion in a zero-trust playbook to be released early next year.  Illustration design by Chris D’Elia based on artwork by Phase4Studios & Yaran/Shutterstock

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency may soon release an initial playbook for departments and agencies to follow while transitioning to a zero-trust cybersecurity architecture. The new guidance will be based on lessons learned from various pilot programs across the government.

December 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
A Hawaii Air National Guard F-22 Raptor flies with an Australian air force E-7A Wedgetail near Oahu, Hawaii, earlier this year. The U.S. Defense Department’s joint all-domain command and control concept envisions connecting any sensors and weapon systems from across the military services while also enhancing the ability to share data with allies and other mission partners. Credit: Air National Guard Staff Sgt. John Linzmeier

The U.S. Defense Department has chalked up a number of accomplishments in a short amount of time aimed at achieving a vision of connecting sensors and weapon systems from all of the military services. However, officials still are assessing the best way to achieve zero trust.

December 1, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
The spread of 5G will accelerate the need for zero-trust security, which in turn will help increase the number and types of networks spawned by the technology. Credit: Fit Ztudio/Shutterstock

The use of zero trust could prove to be a boon for 5G networks by providing vital security across networks made up of a variety of innovative devices and capabilities. Fully established zero trust could allow unprecedented network visibility and situational awareness while ensuring that potential attack points are closed to cyber marauders. Yet, implementing zero trust runs the risk of slowing down the network’s fast data flow if it is not applied properly.

December 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The flexibility enabled by Space Launch Delta 45’s addition of zero-trust architecture to its launch enterprise could enable U.S. Space Force guardians and U.S. Air Force airmen to conduct their launch mission-related tasks from really anywhere. In June, the Space Force and its mission partners at Cape Canaveral successfully launched into medium earth orbit the fifth Lockheed Martin-built Global Positioning System III Space Vehicle, SV05, aboard SpaceX’s Falcon 9 launch vehicle. Credit: SpaceX

The U.S. Space Force Space Launch Delta 45’s addition of zero-trust architecture to the launch enterprise could bring earth-shattering flexibility to its mission operations, its commander says. Under a year-long pilot effort, officials at Patrick Space Force Base, Florida, Space Launch Delta 45’s headquarters, and nearby Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, its launch range, have installed zero trust-related software and hardware into the launch mission system and are conducting beta testing and evaluation of the capabilities.

November 19, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The Department of Justice aims to hold government contractors and federal grant recipients accountable for weak cybersecurity. Credit: Shutterstock/Christopher E. Zimmer

The U.S. Department of Justice, or DOJ, is wielding the proverbial stick to improve cybersecurity across the federal government. Under the Civil Cyber-Fraud Initiative rolled out in October, the DOJ is increasing its actions against federal contractors and grant recipients that neglect to adhere to cybersecurity standards when providing technology solutions or services to the government. The department is relying on fraud provisions under the False Claims Act to pursue this cybersecurity-related legal action.

November 17, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Organizations are seeing the need to bring cybersecurity education to middle schoolers. Credit: Shutterstock/SpeedKingz

The need for the United States to not only have digital literacy but also cybersecurity-educated students is prompting the addition of programs into the middle school level. Students in grades 6-8 can benefit greatly from having a foundational understanding of cyber concepts, as can the nation, officials say.

The U.S. National Security Agency (NSA)/Central Security Service’s National Cryptologic School, which already has a robust offering of cyber education programs across the elementary, high school, college and graduate student levels, is growing its specific offerings to middle schools, teachers and kids age 12-14.

November 8, 2021
By John Dvorak
Zero trust may not be an entirely new concept, but it is still important, says John Dvorak, emerging technology specialist for Red Hat and a member of the AFCEA Technology Committee and Zero Trust Strategies Subcommittee.  By Matt Gibson/Shutterstock

More than just a technology focus, zero trust (ZT) is an invitation for all of us to think differently about cybersecurity. We are losing on the cybersecurity battlefield, and continued investment in more advanced versions of the same architecture patterns will not change that.

November 1, 2021
By George I. Seffers
U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptors fly alongside an Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker during training near Mount Fuji, Japan, earlier this year. U.S. Indo-Pacific Command is building a mission partner environment that will allow greater interoperability between U.S. forces and international partners and allies in the region. Credit: Air Force Senior Airman Rebeckah Medeiros

The U.S. Indo-Pacific Command will deliver an initial mission partner environment next summer. The capability ultimately will allow U.S. forces to access classified and unclassified networks with one device. It also will provide more effective information sharing with allies and coalition forces.

November 1, 2021
By Howard Sutton
U.S. Air Force Airmen speak with reporters on the new innovative Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS) Onramp 2 in September at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland. ABMS is the digital infrastructure which allows a level of connectivity and sensor compatibility for military at war.  Photo by Senior Airman Daniel Hernandez, 1st Combat Camera Squadron

In the current cybersecurity environment, live video and data distributed within physically secure environments, such as a sensitive compartmented information facility (SCIF), command and control centers, situational awareness or secure briefing centers, is no longer safe and secure.

October 28, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Christopher Inglis, national cyber director, speaks at AFCEA’s TechNet Cyber in Baltimore. Photo by Michael Carpenter

One of the early efforts of the national cyber director is to tackle how to strengthen the critical infrastructure of the United States. The key to approaching that overwhelming task is to drive coordination across the federal government and the critical sectors, and to identify the crucial subelements that connect each component, versus trying to protect all sectors at once, which is not quite possible, explained Christopher Inglis, national cyber director, speaking at AFCEA International’s TechNet Cyber conference in Baltimore on October 27.

October 28, 2021
By Beverly Cooper
Wendell E. Foster, Jr., executive director, DODIN (l), and Rear Adm. William E. Chase III, USN, deputy commander, JFHQ-DODIN, talk about the past, present and future of JFHQ-DODIN during TechNet Cyber. Photo by Michael Carpenter

To be prepared for today’s cyberspace competition and ready for tomorrow’s fight requires a new, comprehensive look at strategic focus areas within the Joint Force Headquarters-Department of Defense Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN). Those focus areas include streamlining command and control; organizing battle space; optimizing technology; harnessing the power of partnerships; and cultivating change and talent management.

October 28, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
As part of its academic engagement strategy, U.S. Cyber Command is partnering more closely with the National Defense University and will assist with NDU’s new University Consortium for Cybersecurity effort expected to begin in December, says David Frederick, the command’s executive director. Photo by Michael Carpenter

For the last eleven years, the U.S. Cyber Command, which conducts cyber operations in defense of the nation, has partnered closely with government organizations and private industry to advance is mission. Now, the command, known as USCYBERCOM, is working to bolster its activities with academia as part of its comprehensive engagement plan. It recently launched a new academic engagement strategy that will broaden its communications with more U.S. universities; harness cyber research; promote cyber careers; and add analytical capabilities.

October 25, 2021
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Secretary of State Antony Blinken hosts a town hall with the State Department’s chiefs of mission at the department’s Washington, D.C., headquarters on October 25. Secretary Blinken has approved the creation of a new bureau-level cyber organization at the department. Credit: State Department photo by Freddie Everett

The United States is adding another tool in its attempt to improve cybersecurity. The U.S. State Department is in the process of standing up a bureau of cyberspace and digital policy. The new organization will conduct cyber diplomacy around the globe and set international norms around cybersecurity. The department is also creating a new position at State called the special envoy for critical and emerging technology.

Compared to an ambassador who is stationed in a foreign country to increase bilateral ties with the United States, a special envoy oversees a specific portfolio, in this case, critical and emerging technology. Both the senior bureau official and the special envoy roles would require Senate confirmation.

October 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The addition of cyber offense capabilities by the U.S. Coast Guard Cyber Command marks another step in the service’s growing cyber versatility, says the leader of the command, Rear Adm. Michael Ryan, USCG (l), speaking to Coast Guardsmen in the command’s Cyber Operations Center in Washington, D.C. Credit: USCG Cyber Command

As the 231-year-old U.S. Coast Guard guards the nation’s waterways and ports, more and more it is finding the need to increase its capabilities in the cyber domain, given the rising digital threats to the $5.4 trillion of waterway-based trade. This fall, the maritime service is adding new cyber offensive capabilities and is growing its existing cyber defense, reports Rear Adm. Michael Ryan, USCG, commander of the Coast Guard’s Cyber Command.

August 18, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Credit: Shutterstock/Olivier Le Moal

The Defense Information Systems Agency intends next month to award a contract for its Thunderdome zero-trust architecture and to begin implementing a prototype within six months. The new architecture is expected to enhance security, reduce complexity and save costs while replacing the current defense-in-depth approach to network security.

October 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is developing robotic process automation solutions to automate some computer security authorization processes, which will reduce workloads and offer efficiencies to warfighters, such as to the airmen from the 4th Communications Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, who are responsible for authorizing and supporting about 7,000 computer users at the base.  U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera

The Defense Information Systems Agency is embracing robotic process automation, and it is implementing several steps. The agency is training a cadre of developers, and it is also creating a platform and code library and establishing practices and methods—all to internally improve how it delivers robotic process automation across the agency. By using automated software robots, or bots, that can perform rules-based processes, the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) aims to reduce the workload for humans that conduct repetitive tasks across the agency’s financial, public relations, procurement and other offices.

October 1, 2021
By Col. Dean Hullings, USAF (Ret.)
Military readiness relies on an exchange of information among many different systems, which creates numerous cybersecurity challenges. Credit: U.S. Defense Department/J.M. Eddins Jr., Air Force

With no end in sight to the ever-increasing cybersecurity challenges, the federal government must move quickly and deliberately to adopt an architecture to protect against all outside threats. This means building on existing strengths and bolstering cybersecurity strategies.

October 1, 2021
By Rob Caudill and John Speed Meyers
A new digital rubicon looms on the horizon: the use of open source code as a condition within U.S. Defense Department and intelligence community software acquisition contracts. Credit: Shutterstock/ihor2020

Open source code is used increasingly across the entire federal government and the U.S. military. But a new digital rubicon is looming: the use of open source code as a condition within U.S. Defense Department and intelligence community software acquisition contracts.

October 1, 2021
By Rick Palermo
An important step toward Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification is to conduct a Certified Third Party Assessor Organizations (C3PAO) assessment. Credit: Shutterstock/H_Ko

Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification is a serious and involved process that will take time and resources, and for small companies, it’s often difficult to know where to start. Using these 12 steps, companies can effectively manage the transition from noncompliance to compliance.

October 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Credit: Shutterstock/Ryzhi

As it advances its application of robotic process automation, the Defense Information Systems Agency is expanding its artificial intelligence efforts through a research agreement and a new pilot program. The agency is using these latest efforts to examine the application of artificial intelligence capabilities to network defense—as it conducts its daily around-the-clock mission of protecting the Department of Defense Information Network.

In one effort, the agency is working with Vienna, Virginia-based software company NT Concepts through a cooperative research and development agreement, or CRADA, to apply machine learning (ML) to defensive cyber operations.

October 1, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Credit: Shutterstock/Fit Ztudio

The Defense Information Systems Agency is initially employing robotic process automation, or RPA, to several of its processes in finance, public affairs, circuit management, security authorization and procurement, with an intent to build a robust RPA platform for greater use across the agency. The automated software robots, or bots, will perform repetitive, rules-based processes and considerably reduce the workload of humans, the director of DISA’s Emerging Technology Directorate, Stephen Wallace, shares.

September 21, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Lt. Gen. Timothy Haugh, USAF (right c), commander, 16th Air Force (Air Forces Cyber), and Chief M. Sgt. Kenneth Bruce, USAF (r), command chief, 16th Air Force, discuss the 2nd Combat Weather Systems Squadron efforts during a visit at Hurlburt Field, Florida, in April. The command, which spent the last two years integrating information warfare capabilities including weather intelligence, sees zero trust as a core technology. Credit: USAF photo by Senior Airman Robyn Hunsinger

As the U.S. Air Force advances on its two important pilot programs designed to inform the service’s larger pursuit of zero-trust architecture, the 16th Air Force is playing a key role in helping to examine its use from an operational perspective.

September 15, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA (c), commander, U.S. Cyber Command, speaks on a panel at the Intelligence and National Security Summit. Photo by Herman Farrer

The cyber activities of Russia to try and impact the U.S. presidential elections of 2016 and 2020 are well known, spoken about by U.S. military cyber and other leaders. Going forward toward the mid-term election of 2022, the roster of countries attempting to harm U.S. processes is growing, reports Gen. Paul Nakasone, USA, commander, U.S. Cyber Command. And the command is already preparing to protect the 2022 elections.

September 14, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
Chris Inglis, national cyber director, discusses cybersecurity challenges with Suzanne Kelly, CEO and publisher, The Cipher Brief, at the 2021 Intelligence and National Security Summit.

Eight weeks on the job, the national cyber director, Chris Inglis, is examining the confines of how to approach the cyber adversaries and nation states conducting malicious attacks on the U.S. government, critical infrastructure and private sector. The former deputy director of the National Security Agency and a member of that agency for 28 years, Inglis sees how the Russian government is not taking any action against perpetrators.

September 2, 2021
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
Chief Master Sgt. Denzil Hellesen, USAF (c), 3D0XX career field manager, speaks to other cyber career field leaders during a meeting at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, on August 23. Leaders held a week-long conference to discuss how to transform the service’s cyberspace career fields to advance Air Force cyber capabilities. Credit: U.S. Air Force photo by John Ingle

As the Air Force strives to become a digital force and embraces Chief Gen. C. Q. Brown’s vision of accelerating change, the service is streamlining its cyber and communications career fields. Headquarters Air Force leaders, National Guard and Reserve leaders and major command functional managers of the cyberspace support career field met at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, last week to discuss how to develop the adaptable, agile communications and cyber career fields needed to support future Air Force requirements, reported John Ingle from the 82nd Training Wing Public Affairs.

August 18, 2021
By George I. Seffers
Credit: Gerd Altmann/Pixabay

Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) officials do not plan to try to force others in the Defense Department or military services to use its zero-trust solution known as Thunderdome.

Thunderdome is a fledgling program that offers a range of capabilities, including secure access service edge (SASE), software-defined area networking (SD-WAN), identity credential access management (ICAM) and virtual security stacks.

SASE, which is pronounced “sassy,” is a technology package that includes SD-WAN, firewall as a service and cloud access security broker. While SASE has been implemented across much of the commercial world, it has not yet been widely adopted by the government.

August 24, 2021
By Shaun Waterman
Kay Turner, senior counselor for digital identity, inclusion and payment infrastructure to the director of the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, addresses the virtual 2021 Federal Identity Forum.

The threat to the integrity of the U.S. and global financial system posed by the crisis in online identity is a national security issue, a senior Treasury Department official told the 2021 Federal Identity Forum and Expo Monday.

August 20, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood

The U.S. Air Force is pursuing zero-trust architecture on a level not seen before with the lead command, the Air Combat Command, driving many initiatives with a comprehensive view to employ zero-trust architecture across the service’s bases, weapon systems and mission environments. Supporting the cyberspace and engineering side of the effort is the 16th Air Force’s 688th Cyberspace Wing.

July 30, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
The Defense Information Systems Agency’s Emerging Technology Directorate is beginning a new pilot program to look at how well artificial intelligence and machine learning can be applied to automate aspects of cyber defense. Credit: Shutterstock/cybrain

The Defense Information Systems Agency, known as DISA, is expanding its artificial intelligence (AI) efforts through a research agreement and a new pilot program. While both efforts are in the beginning stages, the agency is considering how to possibly apply the so-called AI capabilities to network defense—among other areas the agency is separately pursuing—as it conducts its daily 24/7 mission of protecting the Department of Defense Information Network, or DODIN.

The agency entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, or CRADA, with Vienna, Virginia-based software company NT Concepts to apply machine learning (ML) to defensive cyber operations.

August 1, 2021
By Jeremy Miller and Dawn Yankeelov
Workforce development must include education and training for cyber readiness.  Envato/mstandret

The small business sector must seize the day and immediately begin taking the steps necessary to implement tools for cyber resilience and cyber readiness. Scaling cybersecurity services, education and training are crucial to national security.

Regarding the cyber warfare landscape for 2021, the most critical group to secure is the small and midsize business sector (SMBs), particularly following the pandemic. When working with tech-specific organizations and the military, process management and a sense of purpose can overcome inertia and apathy until a financial loss appears.

August 5, 2021
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
U.S. Cyber Command cyber warriors and a French cyber professional collaborate during a July 21 training exercise, Cyber Fort III, at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. The Command, along with federal agencies such as the FBI, NSA, DOD and the Department of Justice, will be collaborating with the new Joint Cyber Defense Collaborative to broaden U.S. cyber defenses. Credit: U.S. Cyber Command/Josef Cole

As the United States is more and more under siege against nefarious cyber attacks, the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, or CISA, has been working to educate, advise and partner to protect the nation. In its latest move, CISA has created the Joint Cyber Defense Collaborative to bring defensive cyber capabilities together across the federal government, local and state entities and the private sector, according to an August 5 statement from CISA.

August 1, 2021
By Shaun Waterman
Airman 1st Class William King, USAF, technician, 352nd Special Operations Support Squadron, troubleshoots a modem connected to a parabolic dish in August, at RAF Mildenhall, England. JADC2 relies on globe-spanning high bandwidth links like these. U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Joseph Barron

Earlier this year, Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin signed off on the U.S. Defense Department’s first-ever strategy for Joint All-Domain Command and Control, or JADC2, giving his imprimatur to an ambitious vision of a fully networked U.S. military.

JADC2 aims to provide rear-echelon commanders with continuous connectivity to front-line sensors, providing real-time data and offering an unassailable decision advantage to U.S. forces.

On the digitally managed battlefield envisaged by JADC2, autonomous vehicles and networked weapons would be remotely controlled via cloud-based AI-enabled software, so that a coordinated attack by land, sea, air and cyber forces can be launched with the swipe of a finger.

August 1, 2021
By Cmdr. Erika De La Parra Gehlen, USN
National security objectives can only be achieved when the government and private sector work together. NSA

As China continues to threaten U.S. national security through a whole-of-society warfare strategy, a government-private sector partnership must be a fundamental component of the U.S. government’s approach to information advantage and countering China’s attacks.

July 27, 2021
By Maj. James Torrence, USA
While some tout the idea that U.S. forces could pre-emptively degrade their own technological capabilities in a peer, or near-peer conflict, doing so would lead to losing, says an Army signal officer. Credit: Andy Gin/Shutterstock

The novel 2034 by James Stavridis and Elliot Ackerman perpetuates a fundamental misunderstanding of how technology should be employed and managed in future conflicts.

The continuing narrative is that we should purposely degrade our systems in a conflict with a peer competitor because of the possibility of a degraded spectrum, cyber attacks, space-based detection and jamming. But if we preemptively degrade our technology in a peer conflict, we will lose.

In the novel, after a conflict with the Chinese Navy in which the U.S. technical systems were incapacitated, U.S. ships preemptively disabled “any interface with a computer, a GPS or [any interface] that could conceivably be accessed online.”

July 22, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood
U.S. Air Force airmen at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, work to refuel an F-35A Lighting II aircraft assigned to Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska during the Cope North exercise in February. The airmen were conducting agile combat employment, or ACE, training during the exercise. The service’s ACE operations, which aim to bring more agility, resiliency and deterrence in a near-peer competitive environment, will be supported by its zero-trust architecture platforms. Credit: Pacific Air Forces/Senior Airmen Jona

Led by the Air Combat Command, the U.S. Air Force is pursuing zero-trust architecture on a level not seen before. One of the service’s first main use cases applies the cybersecurity measure to the agile combat employment (ACE). ACE operations provide a more lean, agile and lethal force that can generate airpower from multiple locations. ACE requires a different kind of command and control (C2) environment, as well as advanced planning concepts and logistical supply line support.

July 1, 2021
By Robert K. Ackerman
Two U.S. Navy operations specialists stand watch aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Navy must provide cybersecurity for major systems aboard ships as well as for smaller logistical systems, all of which are targets for digital adversaries.  U.S. Navy photo

The U.S. Navy is moving ahead at full speed to equip its assets with effective cybersecurity. However, the diverse nature of those assets—some are city-size ships while others are small but vital systems—confound planners seeking to ensure interoperable security measures.

June 22, 2021
By Kimberly Underwood

Following the success of some initial, smaller-scale efforts, the U.S. Air Force is pursuing zero trust architecture on a level not seen before. The service’s Air Combat Command is leading the charge into many more initiatives with a comprehensive view to employ zero trust architecture across its bases, weapon systems and missions.

July 1, 2021
By George Galdorisi and Sam Tangredi
A soldier wears virtual reality glasses; a graphic depiction of a chess set sits in the foreground.  Illustration created by NIWC Pacific

Winner of The Cyber Edge 2021 Writing Contest

Convincing senior defense decision makers to significantly invest in artificial intelligence capabilities that would add more value to the United States’ already digitized operational capabilities—particularly in the cyber domain—needs more than pronouncements that “AI can save the taxpayers money.” It requires a logical progression of defining the objective, identifying the need, demonstrating specific results, conducting comprehensive cost analysis and, particularly in the case of applications in the cyber domain, thoughtfully discussing resilience and deception.

By Samuel J. Richman
The vastly complex and subtle digital human network that spans civilian and military populations must be defended as rigorously as computer networks.  Shutterstock/Pop Tika

2nd Place in The Cyber Edge 2021 Writing Contest

The United States stands on the cusp of a future defined by great power competitions that will undoubtedly be characterized by broad, deep and subtle cyber warfare strategies and tactics. The nation must make a deliberate decision to defend the digital human attack surface effectively by blurring traditional battle lines and creating a combined homeland and external battlespace.

July 1, 2021
By Lt. Col. Ryan Kenny, USA
Defending digital ecosystems from information pollution data operators should be a mission the U.S. national security apparatus conducts.  Shutterstock/ NDE12019

3rd Place in The Cyber Edge 2021 Writing Contest

A military-age male left home and traveled through the city, unaware he was being surveilled. Those watching him knew his patterns and preferences. They collected his point of departure, route and destination to predict when he would be most vulnerable for attack. Arriving at a marketplace, he meandered through a few high-traffic areas. Passing down a quiet corridor, he finally provided a clear shot. His smartphone buzzed and its screen flashed: “Two-for-one sale at the nearby pretzel shop!” He was struck by a precision-guided advertisement.