Defense Operations

June 18, 2018
Posted by Kimberly Underwood
A Marine with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit's Force Reconnaissance Platoon waits on the flight deck while training in the Pacific Ocean. Marine Corps Systems Command unveiled its new Binocular Night Vision Goggle II that it is fielding to Force Recon and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Marines this year, with full capability next year. Photo credit: Staff Sgt. T. T. Parish, USMC

U.S. Marine on the move need to be able to negotiate the battlefield effectively. Part of operating on the fly also means working in the dark. To aid warfighters, the Marine Corps Systems Command (MCSC) recently began fielding advanced binoculars to help with improved vision at night, according to a June 18 report from Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication.

June 15, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
In April, various corps headquarters command and staff from several Army bases participated in the Multinational Warfighting Exercise (WFX) 18-4, taking a closer look the service’s tactical network and mission command capabilities, according to the PEO C3T.

Taking the network into battle can be challenging for Army soldiers operating on the tactical edge. The Army’s Command Post Computing Environment, known as CP CE, is an integrated mission command system that supports warfighters across intelligence, fires, logistics, maneuvers and airspace management capabilities. The need for this system to include open system architecture and be interoperable, cost effective and cyber secure are key goals of the Product Manager Mission Command (PM MC) of the Program Executive Office Command, Control, Communications-Tactical (PEO C3T).

June 8, 2018
By Maryann Lawlor
NCIA General Manager Kevin Scheid (2nd row, l) and AFCEA Europe General Manager Maj. Gen. Erich Staudacher, GEAF (Ret.), (2nd row, 3rd from r) congratulate the 10 winning participants in the 2018 NITEC Defence Innovation Challenge. Each company had five minutes to present their product to attendees. The competition drew 35 submissions. Photo courtesy of Chuck Helwig

NATO’s power will grow as partnerships between governments and industry combine their strengths to increase security and bring about progress. The challenges nations face are as much about culture and people as they are about finding the right technologies and efficiently introducing them into the networking ecosystem.

More than 600 senior public and private sector leaders met at NITEC18 to learn about emerging capabilities, discuss digital transformation and collaborate to address the challenges NATO is facing today. The event took place in Berlin and was organized by AFCEA International in cooperation with the German Federal Ministry of Defence.

June 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
A U.S. Army paratrooper patrols Afghanistan’s southern Ghazni province. Using the Army Cloud Computing Enterprise Transformation (ACCENT) contract vehicle, the service will make situational awareness data more easily available at the tactical edge.  U.S. Defense Department

The U.S. Army’s do-it-yourself culture may hinder private cloud adoption, but the service’s premier cloud program could actually promote that DIY instinct.

May 17, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Dana Deasy, the new DOD CIO (r), chats with Brig. Gen. Kevin B. Kennedy, USA, during the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

A technologist who has never served in the military and has never worked in government has taken the reigns as chief information officer (CIO) of the Department of Defense. But Dana Deasy has plenty of experience in almost 37 years as a private industry information technology executive, leading the IT needs of such venerable corporations as JP Morgan Chase & Co., BP Group, General Motors North America, Siemens Corp. Americas, and Tyco International.

May 17, 2018
Kimberly Underwood
Panelists at the Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium discuss AI in the C2 domain.

Experts speaking at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium in Baltimore agree that the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in warfighting, and in command and control (C2) applications in particular, could provide advantages to the warfighter in terms of faster information processing and improved decision making and cyber defense. The hitch, though, is that the quality of data used to build algorithms and add to machine learning can vary. This impacts the quality of AI-related conclusions, which could put warfighters at great risk.

May 15, 2018
Kimberly Underwood
Panelists, moderated by Stephen Wallace, chief technology director, Development and Business Center, DISA (far r), discuss innovation at the AFCEA Defensive Cyber Operations Symposium.

Companies or government agencies that strive for innovation have to keep development at the forefront, experts say. And the action of providing impactful ideas that turn into effective products is always “far more complicated in reality,” according to Jennifer Yates, assistant vice president, AT&T Labs.

May 7, 2018
By George I. Seffers
The U.S. Army is caught up in a cat-and-mouse game trying to keep pace with technological change. Credit: Alexas_Fotos/Pixabay

The U.S. Army may be catching up to adversaries in the information warfare domain, but the pace of change remains a challenge.

“The biggest [capability] gap we have is keeping pace. It is very much a cat-and-mouse game. When you have a cat-and-mouse game, you see a lot of change, so we try to anticipate things,” says Gary Blohm, who directs the Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate (I2WD) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

May 3, 2018
By Paul Parker
Hybrid IT is challenging the Defense Department to improve its admirable security and operations game, says Paul Parker, chief technologist for federal and national government, SolarWinds. Parker offers five strategies for successfully deploying a hybrid IT environment. Credit: TheDigitalArtist/Pixabay

The Department of Defense (DOD) has long been at the tip of the spear when it comes to successfully melding IT security and operations (SecOps). Over the past few decades, the DOD has shown consistent leadership through a commitment to bringing security awareness into just about every facet of its operations. The growing popularity of hybrid IT poses a challenge to the DOD’s well-honed approach to SecOps.

April 25, 2018
By George I. Seffers
The U.S. Air Force is extending its smart base pilot program at Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base, Montgomery, Alabama. Credit: Wikimedia Commons

After about a year, the U.S. Air Force is extending its smart base pilot program at Maxwell-Gunter Air Force Base, Montgomery, Ala. The effort takes advantage of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies and applies the smart city concept to the base. The lessons learned at Maxwell likely will be applied to Air Force bases around the world.

May 1, 2018
By Maj. Ryan Kenny, USA

Unmanned systems and robots are rapidly changing the character of warfare. As the U.S. Defense Department considers their increased use, the time is ripe to discuss both the opportunities and challenges these autonomous systems present on and off the battlefield for military communicators. Communicators deliver and protect command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) services. Unmanned systems rely on digital communication channels to execute tasks and share information. The more systems, the more links required.

The scope of managing these channels is set to explode.

April 18, 2018
By Alana Johnson
The Joint Regional Security Stack architecture enables a robust network-focused defense, shifting away from stovepiped protections by service-specific networks and systems. Credit: TheDigitalArtist/Pixabay

The Defense Information System Agency’s Joint Regional Security Stack (JRSS) initiative is driving and delivering solutions to network defenders and operators across the department, answering a call placed three years ago when the Department of Defense (DOD) cyber strategy established as one of its goals the need to “defend the DOD Information Network, secure DOD data and mitigate risks to DOD missions.”

April 11, 2018
By Tracy Sharpe
All domains—air, land, sea, space and cyber—depend on the availability of radio frequency spectrum. Credit: DISA

The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) is increasing the warfighter’s ability to operate in the complex spectrum environment by providing operational support through electromagnetic battlespace planning, radio frequency deconfliction and joint spectrum interference resolution. DISA’s Defense Spectrum Organization (DSO) ensures the agency and the DOD maintain information dominance through effective electromagnetic spectrum operations.

April 10, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
Russia is preparing to try and dominate the artificial intelligence landscape, and the United States should not be caught off guard, says Samuel Bendett, associate research analyst, Center for Naval Analyses.

Russia is focusing more and more on artificial intelligence, machine learning and autonomous systems, and this effort is like none seen before, according to an expert. The country is calling for an increased response from its academia, industry and military to develop these technologies, said Samuel Bendett, associate research analyst, Center for Naval Analyses.  

April 4, 2018
By Maryann Lawlor
Audience members engage at the AFCEA Mission Command Industry Engagement Symposium roundtable.

The U.S. Army is making some long-needed changes to the way it’s configuring the networks required to prepare for, conduct and win wars. With the promise of increased resources, the service plans to do more than just upgrade its information technology. Instead, it has designed a strategy that incorporates the successes of the past, adjusts where needed in the present and sets the stage for a future that takes advantage of innovative solutions.

April 1, 2018
By Robert K. Ackerman
A Romanian navy helicopter prepares to land on the deck of a frigate during maneuvers by Standing NATO Maritime Group 2 in the Black Sea. The NATO Communications and Information (NCI) Agency is looking toward industry to equip its military and organizational forces with proven technologies that enhance mobile links.

NATO is moving into the digital realm deliberately, avoiding a headlong rush into new technologies, even though it is committed to modernizing its communications and information systems on a large scale. The alliance is incorporating new information technologies without breaking either the bank or speed records by tapping the expertise of others to bring digital benefits to the organization and its forces.

April 1, 2018
By George I. Seffers
NATO  is building a wide range of technological capabilities, including open source intelligence, counterterrorism, artificial intelligence, space-based surveillance, electronic warfare and biometric solutions.

NATO is building a wide range of technological capabilities, including open source intelligence, counterterrorism, artificial intelligence, space-based surveillance, electronic warfare and biometric solutions, some of which were previously left to the individual nations or other international organizations.

The flurry of activity amounts to a complete metamorphosis of NATO’s intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) assets, according to Matt Roper, the joint ISR chief within NATO’s Communications and Information Agency. Roper notes that the alliance’s new direction results directly from the 2012 summit in Chicago.

April 1, 2018
By Lt. Gen. Robert M. Shea, USMC (Ret.)

As global security becomes more uncertain, NATO only grows in importance to its members. We’ve seen the repeated bad behavior of Russia, the continued chaos of the Middle East, the influence of Iran moving throughout the region and beyond, the increasingly bellicose activity of North Korea, and the ceaseless threat of ISIS all affecting NATO’s strategic interests. The alliance represents a unique set of international political and defense standards, values and norms that form the basis for rules-based order in Western civilization. Further, member nations underpin each other’s economies with dynamic trade and security.

March 29, 2018
By Jane Melia
The cloud is widely considered to be more secure than on-premises data centers in most situations, but this doesn’t mean getting rid of on-premises storage entirely. Credit: geralt/Pixabay

Every day, more and more government organizations are moving IT functions and data storage to the cloud. Early last month, the U.S. Department of Defense signed a multimillion-dollar contract to encourage organizations under its umbrella to move to the cloud. While the needs of public-sector entities differ from those of the private sector, there are some hard-won data security lessons corporations have learned—such as encryption key management and the use of cryptographic gateways—that can be useful for government organizations as they plan and execute a migration to the cloud.

March 28, 2018
By Kimberly Underwood
The Air Force launches the ninth Boeing-built Wideband Global SATCOM satellite at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, in March 2017. Such satellites play an integral part of the United State’s strategic and tactical coordination of military operations in an increasingly contested space domain. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Anthony Nelson; Courtesy of United Launch Alliance.

While space has been a contested domain from the beginning—from the first trial of an anti-satellite weapon in 1959—what has changed is the United State’s confidence in being able to deter attacks, according to several officials who testified recently about U.S. space warfare readiness before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Armed Services. The space domain is more complex and more is at stake, the experts told Congress.

“"Today’s military commanders are facing serious threats in a space domain that is increasingly congested, contested and competitive," said Gen. Robert Kehler, USAF (Ret.), former commander, U.S. Strategic Command.

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