Agenda

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

7:00 a.m. – 8:00 a.m.
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
Sponsored by   


8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
AFCEA WELCOME & SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW

Mr. Ray Cross
Vice President for Intelligence
AFCEA International

VADM Jake Jacoby, USN (Ret.)
Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee


8:30 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
THE 2018 CHARLIE ALLEN AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED INTELLIGENCE SERVICE

VADM Jake Jacoby, USN (Ret.)
Chair
AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Ms. Maureen Baginski
Charlie Allen Award Recipient


9:15 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
KEYNOTE ONE: THE IC AND THE NEW NATIONAL SECURITY STRATEGY
The Honorable Sue Gordon is the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence.  One of her key responsibilities is to map the future for the Intelligence Community (IC).  She will share her views on technology and operations and the need for an Intelligence Community to improve to meet changing threats, improve digital capabilities, deal with data abundance and evolve within fiscal realities.  She will discuss the need to build upon DoD and private sector investments to enable to IC to “go fast” and make tailored investments unique to foundational IC missions.

Introduction
Ms. Terry Roberts
Chief Executive Officer and Founder 
Whitehawk, Inc.

Speaker
Hon. Sue Gordon
Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence
Office of the Director of National Intelligence


10:15 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS


11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
SESSION ONE: THE THREAT ENVIRONMENT
In the 20th Century, the United States led the world to an international order that promoted accountable government, liberalized trade, and successfully resisted fascism and communism. Today, the United States faces increased global disorder and a security environment that is complex and volatile. Authoritarianism is on the rise, with a revanchist Russia violating the borders of its neighbors and an aggressive China intimidating its neighbors and extending its military power into the East and South China Sea.  Military modernization efforts by both nations have created challenges to US military superiority.  North Korea  continues to pursue its nuclear and missile programs that pose a direct threat to the US mainland; Iran is pursuing efforts to enhance its military capabilities and involve itself directly by deploying expeditionary forces in several Arab states that add significantly to the instability in the Middle East; it also sponsors terrorism around the world.  US supported forces have largely driven ISIS and other terrorist groups from the battlefield in Syria and Iraq, but ISIS itself has been able to establish outposts in such far areas as the Philippines and Malaysia; a number of its fighters also are returning their homes in Western Europe, posing a long-term potential violent threat among US close allies.  Russian-sponsored “influence operations,” supercharged by its use of social media, are continuing to sow confusion in the election processes of democratic states.  Both state and non-state actors continue to  further the proliferation of nuclear, biological, and missile capabilities.  Cyber activities by these state and non-state actors threaten US critical infrastructure and create asymmetric conditions in our national security posture.  The panel will discuss this complex and dangerous threat environment and provide insight into how the United States and its allies can confront the grave challenges involved. 

Moderator
Mr. Charlie Allen
Principal
The Chertoff Group

Panelists
Mr. Randall Blake
National Intelligence Officer (NIO) for Transnational Threats

Mr. Chris Bort 
National Intelligence Officer (NIO) for Russia
Mr. John Culver 
National Intelligence Officer (NIO) for East Asia
Mr. Neil Wiley
Director of Analysis
Defense Intelligence Agency
 

Focus Questions:

  • The National Security Strategy indicates a shift in emphasis towards great power relations and potential conflict for the first time in nearly two decades.  From your perspective, what the most serious threats that our nation is likely to face over the next twelve to twenty-four months?  Are we well-positioned as an Intelligence Community to provide warning of flashpoints/breakpoints prior to a full-blown crisis?
  • How do you see military modernization efforts by near peers and asymmetries derived from technology affecting the national security threats from your respective areas of concern?  Historically the IC was well-positioned to examine, evaluate, and even counter new technologies.   Can we avoid strategic surprise as adversaries move rapidly toward new and agile intelligence and military capabilities?
  • As ISIS nears complete defeat in Syria and Iraq, concern shifts to the migration of fighters to areas in Asia and Europe.  How is that affecting the ability of the Intelligence Community to monitor and stem threats to the United States and its allies?  How strong are our current intelligence partnerships and do we not need greater intelligence relationships with non-traditional services?
  • Russian influence operations are widely viewed as having been both very affective and largely unchallenged.  What can you tell us about efforts by the Intelligence Community to characterize fully and counter this threat?  What impact are these operations having in other parts of the world?  What are other adversaries learning from the Russians and how are we addressing those concerns?  Are political divisions within the United States having a debilitating effect on historically positive partnerships between US and allied intelligence services?

12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
LUNCH & EXHIBITS 


2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.
SESSION TWO: INFORMATION AND DATA MODERNIZATION
The NSS states that “The ability to harness the power of data is fundamental….data, like energy, will shape US economic prosperity and our future strategic position in the world.”  For the IC, new classes of intelligence which it neither tasks nor controls, particularly publicly available information (PAI), are evolving with unprecedented volume, variety and velocity.  These open sources are increasingly supplanting traditional SIGINT, IMINT and HUMINT sources.  While presenting great vulnerabilities, this information revolution offers great opportunities if the IC can harness the data to solve vexing problems and apply it against mission needs.  This session will examine the hard problems involved in harnessing this data, applying emerging technologies such as artificial intelligence, machine and deep learning, and actioning big data across the IC.  It will also consider the impact and implications of these changes on the workforce of the future.

Moderator
Dr. Lisa Costa
AFCEA Intelligence Committee Member

Panelists
Dr. David Bray
Executive Director 
People Centered Internet
Maj. Gen. James Marrs, USAF
Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance
Headquarters U.S. Air Force
Mr. David Nolton
Director, Region Services
Amazon Web Services
Mr. Dean Souleles
Chief Technology Advisor to the Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence
Office of the Director of National Intelligence
 

Focus Questions:

  • What are the most promising data sources and technologies that the IC must access and harness to solve the very hard intelligence problems and provide strategic, operational and tactical advantage?
  • What are the opportunities and limitations on our current and projected data infrastructure to realize the opportunities presented by the information revolution?
  • Has the IC made necessary investments in artificial intelligence and machine learning to automate routine functions and find meaning in the big data stream?  Where has the IC found success? Where is it struggling?
  • What partnerships, policies and technological advances are required for the IC to more effectively mix and cross-cue open sources and classified data to meet mission objectives?

3:15 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. 
STRETCH BREAK


3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.
SESSION THREE: THE REVOLUTION IN SPACE
Convergence of major components of the digital age has fundamentally increased the technical maturity and sophistication of potential adversary military and intelligence services that carry great implications for national security.  Global networks have shifted to agile, mobile applications and technologies and cyber is transitioning from “cable bound” to RF space.  In combination, developments have eroded ability to protect intelligence capabilities and project national power surreptitiously and decisively.  This panel will explore forces such as hyper-proliferation of sensors, the global “Internet of Things,” “Dark Web” technologies, and other advances that combine to create dangerous and vexing challenges.  It will discuss potential strategies to converge Big Data, Big Sensor and Big Cyber capabilities into a connected environment that extends from the ocean floor to space.  The panel will discuss the imperative for rapid and decisive IC action to achieve asymmetric advantage in this dangerous and evolving environment and the need for revolutionary space-based intelligence capabilities.

Moderator
Dr. Dave Honey

Senior Technical Advisor
Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Panelists
Mr. Paul Laugesen
Chief, Collection, Exploitation, and Cryptanalysis
National Security Agency

Mr. Aaron Moore 
Chief Technology Officer, Intelligence Solutions Business Unit
Northrop Grumman Corporation
Mr. Bill Webster 
Space Systems Advisor
Intellispace Consulting

Focus Questions:

  • What is the IC strategy for leveraging the emergence of Phase 4 Internet capabilities and what is required to achieve asymmetric advantage?
  • What vulnerabilities does the convergence of these technologies and applications present for US and allied national security?
  • What changes are needed within the IC, including cyber operations, to deal with the accelerating changes in global communications?
  • What are the implications for cryptography, cryptology and personal privacy?

4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
SYMPOSIUM RECEPTION


Thursday, April 19, 2018

7:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST

Sponsored by    


8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.
DAY TWO WELCOME & ADMINISTRATIVE ANNOUNCEMENTS

Mr. Ray Cross
Vice President for Intelligence
AFCEA International

LTG Bob Noonan, USA (Ret.)
Vice Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee


8:45 a.m. – 9:15 a.m.
MODERATED FIRESIDE CHAT: ACTING ON THE NEW NATIONAL DEFENSE STRATEGY 

Introduction & Moderator
VADM Jake Jacoby, USN (Ret).
Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Speaker
Hon. Joe Kernan, Vice Admiral, USN (Ret.)
Under Secretary for Defense Intelligence

9:15 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
NETWORKING BREAK & EXHIBITS


9:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.
SESSION FOUR: IC TECHNICAL & TECHNOLOGY MODERNIZATION 
The NSS says the “United States will prioritize emerging technologies critical to economic growth and security.” It goes on to specify needs to understand S&T trends, improve collaboration with industry and academia, use private sector technical expertise and R&D capabilities and rapidly field innovations.  Against this backdrop, we will discuss needs within the IC that span technical collection, analyses, and threat, as well as the need to solve hard problems from emerging science and technology and the lowering of barriers to complex tools and arsenals in cyber, biology, nuclear physics, materials science, and chemistry.  Once reserved for only nation states, emerging science and technology (S&T) capabilities will have a profound impact on national security with few apparent opportunities for deterrence. Genomic editing (e.g., CRISPR), additive manufacturing with composite materials, quantum computing and encryption, electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attacks, and miniaturization of highly scalable sensors hidden in multiple form factors, all have the potential for coming into the hands of individuals. At the same time, new delivery mechanisms (e.g., weaponized unmanned vehicles of all types) are growing in popularity with increased capability and decreased cost. Attacks that were not possible ten years ago are now a reality. Much of the expertise for weaponizing  these emerging technologies resides not in government but in the private sector,  with small-form-factor weapons of mass destruction soon plausibly harnessed not only by laboratories, but by individuals and small groups. This panel will explore emerging new S&T threats and address how the IC should respond.

Moderator
Mr. Lewis Shepherd
AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Panelists
Dr. Rhonda Anderson
Deputy NIO for Science & Technology
Office of the Director of National Intelligence

Dr. Raymond Cook
Chief Technical Officer
Central Intelligence Agency

Dr. Jason Matheny
Director
Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA)

Focus Questions:

  • What skills sets and knowledge does the government need from industry and academia to better understand the impact of these new technologies on the threat environment? How does the clearance process help and hinder this objective?
  • Because technology is changing at such a fast speed, what has the IC done or what are its plans to embrace technology-driven capability in acquisition, vice only validated-requirements-driven capability? 
  • With the emergence of new commercial capabilities, once reserved for nation-state actors, how will the IC obtain the required expertise and indications and warning (I&W) for both vertical and horizontal proliferation of knowledge and skills in emerging new S&T?
  • How will new PAI sensors enable and challenge the IC in detecting intent and capability of nation-state and non-state bad actors? What are the implications for operational security?
  • What can the US do to better secure critical infrastructure against emerging new capabilities that foil traditional security measures?

11:00 a.m.  - 12:15 p.m.
LUNCH & EXHIBITS 


12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
KEYNOTE TWO: STRATEGIC CAPABILITIES AND THE IC

Introduction & Moderator
Mr. Lewis Shepherd
AFCEA Intelligence Committee

Speaker
Dr. Sharon Beermann-Curtin
Acting Director, Strategic Capabilities Office

 

1:15 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
SESSION FIVE: THE IC -- USG & PRIVATE SECTOR -- WORKFORCE OF THE FUTURE
The NSS lays out the requirement for intelligence to “understand and anticipate foreign doctrine and the intent of foreign leaders, prevent tactical and operational surprise and ensure that U.S. capabilities are not compromised before they are fielded.”  These broad expectations place simultaneous requirements for deep expertise and rapid adoption of technologies in a climate of rapid change.  To be successful, the workforce must provide deep expertise produced by continuity and adaption required by constant modernization.  This panel will explore these competing priorities and how they will be addressed, the role that industry will play in a combined IC approach and how talent can be recruited and retained to provide the capabilities the NSS requires.

Moderator
VADM Jake Jacoby, USN (Ret.)
Chair, AFCEA Intelligence Committee
Former Director, Defense Intelligence Agency

Panelists
Mr. Robert Cardillo
Director
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

Ms. Melissa Drisko
Deputy Director
Defense Intelligence Agency
Ms. Lauren Parsons
Deputy Director, Workforce Support
National Security Agency
Ms. Carrie Wibben
Director, Counterintelligence & Security
Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Intelligence)
 

 

 

 

 

Focus Questions:

  • What skills and skill mix will be required in the future workforce and how will they differ from the skills resident in today’s workforce?  What skills and capabilities will be required of the private sector to meet future intelligence needs?
  • Is the IC capable of recruiting for today’s and future needs?  Is it retaining the skill base needed for future success?
  • How do various proposals to facilitate increased personnel movement between Government and industry figure into future workforce planning?
  • What is the status of clearance reform?  What changes are anticipated?  How will they facilitate recruiting and retaining a cleared workforce with the requisite skills in Government and the private sector?

2:30 p.m. - 2:45 p.m.
SYMPOSIUM WRAP-UP